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Carissa Romero
Stanford University
7Publications
4H-index
484Citations
Publications 7
Newest
#1David S. Yeager (University of Texas at Austin)H-Index: 23
#2Paul Hanselman (UCI: University of California, Irvine)H-Index: 6
Last.Carol S. Dweck (Stanford University)H-Index: 76
view all 0 authors...
A global priority for the behavioural sciences is to develop cost-effective, scalable interventions that could improve the academic outcomes of adolescents at a population level, but no such interventions have so far been evaluated in a population-generalizable sample. Here we show that a short (less than one hour), online growth mindset intervention—which teaches that intellectual abilities can be developed—improved grades among lower-achieving students and increased overall enrolment to advanc...
#1Eric N. Smith (Stanford University)H-Index: 2
#2Carissa Romero (Stanford University)H-Index: 4
Last.Lisa Feldman Barrett L F (Stanford University)H-Index: 131
view all 8 authors...
#1David S. YeagerH-Index: 23
#2Carissa RomeroH-Index: 4
Last.Carol S. DweckH-Index: 76
view all 14 authors...
#1David S. YeagerH-Index: 23
#2Carissa RomeroH-Index: 4
Last.Carol S. DweckH-Index: 76
view all 14 authors...
#1David S. Yeager (University of Texas at Austin)H-Index: 23
#2Carissa Romero (Stanford University)H-Index: 4
Last.Carol S. Dweck (Stanford University)H-Index: 76
view all 14 authors...
There are many promising psychological interventions on the horizon, but there is no clear methodology for preparing them to be scaled up. Drawing on design thinking, the present research formalizes a methodology for redesigning and tailoring initial interventions. We test the methodology using the case of fixed versus growth mindsets during the transition to high school. Qualitative inquiry and rapid, iterative, randomized “A/B” experiments were conducted with ∼3,000 participants to inform inte...
#1David Paunesku (Stanford University)H-Index: 6
#2Gregory M. Walton (Stanford University)H-Index: 27
Last.Carol S. Dweck (Stanford University)H-Index: 76
view all 6 authors...
The efficacy of academic-mind-set interventions has been demonstrated by small-scale, proof-of-concept interventions, generally delivered in person in one school at a time. Whether this approach could be a practical way to raise school achievement on a large scale remains unknown. We therefore delivered brief growth-mind-set and sense-of-purpose interventions through online modules to 1,594 students in 13 geographically diverse high schools. Both interventions were intended to help students pers...
#1Carissa Romero (Stanford University)H-Index: 4
#2Allison Master (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 10
Last.Lisa Feldman Barrett L F (Stanford University)H-Index: 131
view all 5 authors...
Adolescents face many academic and emotional challenges in middle school, but notable differences are evident in how well they adapt. What predicts adolescents’ academic and emotional outcomes during this period? One important factor might be adolescents’ implicit theories about whether intelligence and emotions can change. The current study examines how these theories affect academic and emotional outcomes. One hundred fifteen students completed surveys throughout middle school, and their grade...
#1Elizabeth A. Gunderson (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 13
#2Sarah J. Gripshover (Stanford University)H-Index: 3
Last.Susan C. Levine (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 45
view all 6 authors...
In laboratory studies, praising children's effort encourages them to adopt incremental motivational frameworks—they believe ability is malleable, attribute success to hard work, enjoy challenges, and generate strategies for improvement. In contrast, praising children's inherent abilities encourages them to adopt fixed-ability frameworks. Does the praise parents spontaneously give children at home show the same effects? Although parents' early praise of inherent characteristics was not associated...
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