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Robert Lowe
Queen Mary University of London
DNA methylationMethylationEpigeneticsGeneticsBiology
38Publications
17H-index
821Citations
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Publications 42
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#1Robert LoweH-Index: 17
#2Amy F. DansonH-Index: 2
Last. Chris G. FaulkesH-Index: 35
view all 8 authors...
The naked mole-rat, Heterocephalus glaber (NMR), the longest-lived rodent, is of significance and interest in the study of biomarkers for ageing. Recent breakthroughs in this field have revealed 'epigenetic clocks' that are based on the temporal accumulation of DNA methylation at specific genomic sites. Here, we validate the hypothesis of an epigenetic clock in NMRs based on changes in methylation of targeted CpG sites. We initially analysed 51 CpGs in NMR livers spanning an age range of 39-1,14...
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#1Michael J. Cripps (NTU: Nottingham Trent University)H-Index: 1
#2Marta Bagnati (QMUL: Queen Mary University of London)H-Index: 1
Last. Mark D. Turner (NTU: Nottingham Trent University)H-Index: 17
view all 14 authors...
Abstract The worldwide prevalence of diabetes has reached 8.5% among adults, and this is characterised by elevated glucose concentrations and failing insulin secretion. Furthermore, most people with type 2 diabetes are either obese or overweight, with the associated dyslipidaemia contributing to the development of insulin resistance and increased cardiovascular risk. Here we incubated INS-1 pancreatic β-cells for 72h in RPMI-1640 media, or media supplemented with 28mM glucose, 200µM palmitic aci...
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#1Christopher G. Bell (QMUL: Queen Mary University of London)H-Index: 23
#2Robert Lowe (QMUL: Queen Mary University of London)H-Index: 17
Last. Vardhman K. Rakyan (QMUL: Queen Mary University of London)H-Index: 34
view all 21 authors...
Epigenetic clocks comprise a set of CpG sites whose DNA methylation levels measure subject age. These clocks are acknowledged as a highly accurate molecular correlate of chronological age in humans and other vertebrates. Also, extensive research is aimed at their potential to quantify biological aging rates and test longevity or rejuvenating interventions. Here, we discuss key challenges to understand clock mechanisms and biomarker utility. This requires dissecting the drivers and regulators of ...
12 CitationsSource
#1Celia Lujan (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 2
#1C. Lujan (UCL: University College London)
Last. I. Bjedov (UCL: University College London)
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We aim to improve anti-ageing drug discovery, currently achieved through laborious and lengthy longevity analysis. Recent studies demonstrated that the most accurate molecular method to measure human age is based on CpG methylation profiles, as exemplified by several epigenetics clocks that can accurately predict an individual9s age. Here, we developed CellAge, a new epigenetic clock that measures subtle ageing changes in primary human cells in vitro. As such, it provides a unique tool to measur...
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#1Michela Borghesan (QMUL: Queen Mary University of London)H-Index: 2
#2Juan Fafián-Labora (QMUL: Queen Mary University of London)H-Index: 2
Last. Ana O'Loghlen (QMUL: Queen Mary University of London)H-Index: 14
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Summary Senescence is a cellular phenotype present in health and disease, characterized by a stable cell-cycle arrest and an inflammatory response called senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). The SASP is important in influencing the behavior of neighboring cells and altering the microenvironment; yet, this role has been mainly attributed to soluble factors. Here, we show that both the soluble factors and small extracellular vesicles (sEVs) are capable of transmitting paracrine senesc...
2 CitationsSource
#1Marek Wojciechowski (QMUL: Queen Mary University of London)H-Index: 4
#2Robert Lowe (QMUL: Queen Mary University of London)H-Index: 17
Last. Paul J. Hurd (QMUL: Queen Mary University of London)H-Index: 14
view all 6 authors...
11 CitationsSource
#1Amy F. Danson (QMUL: Queen Mary University of London)H-Index: 2
#2Sarah J. Marzi (QMUL: Queen Mary University of London)H-Index: 5
Last. Vardhman K. Rakyan (QMUL: Queen Mary University of London)H-Index: 34
view all 5 authors...
Environmental influences fluctuate throughout the life course of an organism. It is therefore important to understand how the timing of exposure impacts molecular responses. Herein, we examine the responses of two key molecular markers of dietary stress, namely variant-specific methylation at ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and small RNA distribution, including tRNA fragments, in a mouse model of protein restriction (PR) with exposure at pre- and/or post-weaning. We first confirm that pre-weaning PR exposu...
3 CitationsSource
#1Robert Lowe (QMUL: Queen Mary University of London)H-Index: 17
#2Carl Barton (QMUL: Queen Mary University of London)H-Index: 5
Last. Vardhman K. RakyanH-Index: 34
view all 14 authors...
Mammalian species exhibit a wide range of lifespans. To date, a robust and dynamic molecular readout of these lifespan differences has not yet been identified. Recent studies have established the existence of ageing-associated differentially methylated positions (aDMPs) in human and mouse. These are CpG sites at which DNA methylation dynamics show significant correlations with age. We hypothesise that aDMPs are pan-mammalian and are a dynamic molecular readout of lifespan variation among differe...
7 CitationsSource
#1Matthias Thurner (University of Oxford)H-Index: 4
#2Martijn van de Bunt (University of Oxford)H-Index: 24
Last. Mark I. McCarthy (University of Oxford)H-Index: 162
view all 15 authors...
Human genetic studies have emphasised the dominant contribution of pancreatic islet dysfunction to development of Type 2 Diabetes (T2D). However, limited annotation of the islet epigenome has constrained efforts to define the molecular mechanisms mediating the, largely regulatory, signals revealed by Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS). We characterised patterns of chromatin accessibility (ATAC-seq, n=17) and DNA methylation (whole-genome bisulphite sequencing, n=10) in human islets, generati...
38 CitationsSource
#1Matthias Thurner (University of Oxford)H-Index: 4
#2Martijn van de Bunt (University of Oxford)H-Index: 24
Last. Mark I. McCarthy (University of Oxford)H-Index: 162
view all 15 authors...
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