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Arber Tasimi
Stanford University
10Publications
5H-index
65Citations
Publications 10
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#1Arber Tasimi (Stanford University)H-Index: 5
#2Lisa Feldman Barrett L F (Stanford University)H-Index: 138
Money is generally seen as good, but what about when it is morally tainted? Does this affect whether people want money or how they would spend it? In this article, we review a nascent literature on...
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#1Arber Tasimi (Stanford University)H-Index: 5
#2Marcia K. Johnson (Yale University)H-Index: 84
This study assessed children's preference, giving, and memory to investigate the impact of social information over time. We compared 5- and 6-year-olds' (N = 144) immediate or delayed responses to an individual who does or does not share their toy preference (similar vs. dissimilar) or an individual who treats others kindly or poorly (nice vs. mean). Immediately, children all preferred the similar or nice characters but gave more stickers to the similar character. This strong initial effect of s...
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#1Arber Tasimi (Yale University)H-Index: 5
#2Susan A. Gelman (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 65
Last.Joshua Knobe (Yale University)H-Index: 34
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Generic statements (e.g., “Birds lay eggs”) express generalizations about categories. Current theories suggest that people should be especially inclined to accept generics that involve threatening information. However, previous tests of this claim have focused on generics about non-human categories, which raises the question of whether this effect applies as readily to human categories. In Experiment 1, adults were more likely to accept generics involving a threatening (vs. a non-threatening) pr...
3 CitationsSource
#1Arber Tasimi (Yale University)H-Index: 5
#2Marcia K. Johnson (Yale University)H-Index: 84
Last.Karen Wynn (Yale University)H-Index: 38
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Abstract When children’s self-interests are at odds with their moral considerations, what do they do? In the current study of 5- and 6-year-olds (N = 160), we asked (a) whether children would select the offering of a do-gooder over a neutral individual at a personal cost, (b) whether they would reject the offering of a wrongdoer over a neutral individual at a personal cost, and (c) whether these two types of decisions involve comparable levels of conflict. In the absence of material consideratio...
5 CitationsSource
#1Arber Tasimi (Yale University)H-Index: 5
#2Susan A. Gelman (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 65
Although traditional economic models posit that money is fungible, psychological research abounds with examples that deviate from this assumption. Across eight experiments, we provide evidence that people construe physical currency as carrying traces of its moral history. In Experiments 1 and 2, people report being less likely to want money with negative moral history (i.e., stolen money). Experiments 3-5 provide evidence against an alternative account that people's judgments merely reflect beli...
3 CitationsSource
#1Arber Tasimi (Yale University)H-Index: 5
#2Liane Young (BC: Boston College)H-Index: 35
Abstract Does considering one’s past prosociality affect future behavior? Prior research has revealed instances in which adults engage in additional prosocial behavior—moral reinforcement—as well as instances in which adults engage in worse behavior—moral licensing. The current study examined the developmental origins of these effects by testing whether 6- to 8-year-old children (N = 225) are more or less generous after recalling their own good deeds. Children were asked to recount a time when t...
9 CitationsSource
#1Arber Tasimi (Yale University)H-Index: 5
#2Karen Wynn (Yale University)H-Index: 38
Abstract How unappealing are individuals who behave badly towards others? We show here that children and even infants, although motivated by material rewards, are nonetheless willing to incur costs to avoid “doing business” with a wrongdoer. When given the choice to accept a smaller offering from a do-gooder or a larger offering from a wrongdoer, children and infants chose to accept the smaller offering. It was only when the difference between the offerings was very large that their aversion to ...
15 CitationsSource
Although children’s initial perceptions and judgments about sociomoral situations are being actively explored, little is known about what children remember about them. In four experiments testing over 400 children, we investigated children’s memories for small acts of giving and taking. When asked to recall their own giving and taking, children were relatively accurate following a number of delays. In contrast, when asked to recall a child’s giving or taking, children exaggerated the child’s tak...
6 CitationsSource
#1Arber Tasimi (Yale University)H-Index: 5
#2Amy Dominguez (Yale University)H-Index: 1
Last.Karen Wynn (Yale University)H-Index: 38
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Generosity is greatly valued and admired, but can it sometimes be unappealing? The current study investigated 8- to 10-year-old children’s (N = 128) preference for generous individuals, and the effects of social comparison on their preferences. In Experiment 1, children showed a strong preference for a generous to a stingy child; however, this preference was significantly reduced in a situation that afforded children a comparison of their own (lesser) generosity to that of another child. In Expe...
6 CitationsSource
#1Acacia C. Parks (Hiram College)H-Index: 14
#2Stephen M. Schueller (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 1
Last.Arber Tasimi (Yale University)H-Index: 5
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18 CitationsSource
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