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Tony Craig
James Hutton Institute
64Publications
8H-index
213Citations
Publications 65
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#2Tony Craig (James Hutton Institute)H-Index: 8
Last.Jennie I. MacdiarmidH-Index: 16
view all 4 authors...
Financial Support: This work was supported by the Scottish Government Rural and Environment Science and Analytical Services (RESAS) division. RESAS had no role in the design, analysis or writing of this article.
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#1Graham W. HorganH-Index: 39
#2Andrea Scalco (Aberd.: University of Aberdeen)H-Index: 1
Last.Jennie I. Macdiarmid (Aberd.: University of Aberdeen)H-Index: 16
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Abstract The amount of meat consumed is having a negative impact on both health and the environment. This study investigated the probability of eating meat and the amount eaten at a meal within different social, temporal and situational contexts. Dietary intake data from 4-day diet diaries of adults (19 years and above) taken from the UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey (2008/9-2013/14) were used for the analysis. Individual eating occasions were identified and the effects of where the food wa...
1 CitationsSource
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#1Kathryn Colley (James Hutton Institute)H-Index: 4
#2Tony Craig (James Hutton Institute)H-Index: 8
Abstract Wildness is not only a quality associated with remote landscapes; it may be perceived to differing degrees in greenspaces in and around settlements. While place attachment in relation to rural wild land settings has been widely studied and wildness (or its analogue naturalness) appears to be a central dimension of sense of place and landscape preferences, little is known about the role of perceived wildness in attachment to the everyday green/blue environments that serve as important re...
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#1Graham W. HorganH-Index: 39
#2Janet KyleH-Index: 22
Last.Jennie I. MacdiarmidH-Index: 16
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#1V. AsvatourianH-Index: 1
#2Tony Craig (James Hutton Institute)H-Index: 8
Last.Jennie I. Macdiarmid (Aberd.: University of Aberdeen)H-Index: 16
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Abstract Some of the biggest challenges facing humanity are climate change and future food security, and current dietary patterns are contributing significantly to these problem. While the causes of climate change are known, effective adaption and mitigation will require changing human behaviour and diet. The aim of this study is to explore the link between people’s dietary intakes and their behaviour and attitudes to pro-environmental issues. Cluster analysis was used to identify dietary patter...
2 CitationsSource
#1Jiaqi Ge (James Hutton Institute)H-Index: 3
#2J. Gareth Polhill (James Hutton Institute)H-Index: 2
Last.Nan Liu (Aberd.: University of Aberdeen)H-Index: 1
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Abstract This paper develops an empirical, multi-layered and spatially-explicit agent-based model that explores sustainable pathways for Aberdeen city and surrounding area to transition from an oil-based economy to green growth. The model takes an integrated, complex systems approach to urban systems and incorporates the interconnectedness between people, households, businesses, industries and neighbourhoods. We find that the oil price collapse could potentially lead to enduring regional decline...
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#1Jan Vávra (Sewanee: The University of the South)H-Index: 6
#2Boldizsár Megyesi (MTA: Hungarian Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 4
Last.Eva Cudlínová (Sewanee: The University of the South)H-Index: 4
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This article presents the results of an international comparative study on food self-provisioning, an activity still widespread in the countries of the Global North. We collected the data in a sociological survey done in 2010 as a part of the household energy use research project GILDED. We selected a region with urban and rural areas as a case study in each of the five EU countries, including Scotland, the Netherlands, Germany, the Czech Republic, and Hungary. Our article raises two main resear...
3 CitationsSource
#1Jiaqi Ge (James Hutton Institute)H-Index: 3
#2J. Gareth Polhill (James Hutton Institute)H-Index: 2
Last.Tony Craig (James Hutton Institute)H-Index: 8
view all 3 authors...
Using a spatial agent-based model of transport, this paper explores various “unconventional” workplace sharing programmes that allow employees to work remotely at other work sites in Northeast Scotland, with Aberdeenshire Council as the focal employer. We attempt to answer the following research questions: (i) To what extent do systemic effects arising from agent interactions within the transport network mitigate or enhance any potential benefits of workplace sharing? (ii) How are these effects ...
3 CitationsSource
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