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Ethan Porter
George Washington University
Public opinionPolitical sciencePublic relationsSocial psychologyPolitics
22Publications
4H-index
91Citations
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Publications 27
Newest
#1Matthew J. Salganik (Princeton University)H-Index: 17
#2Ian Lundberg (Princeton University)H-Index: 2
Last. Ryan J. Compton (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)
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How predictable are life trajectories? We investigated this question with a scientific mass collaboration using the common task method; 160 teams built predictive models for six life outcomes using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, a high-quality birth cohort study. Despite using a rich dataset and applying machine-learning methods optimized for prediction, the best predictions were not very accurate and were only slightly better than those from a simple benchmark model. ...
4 CitationsSource
#1William G. HowellH-Index: 26
#2Ethan PorterH-Index: 4
Last. Thomas WoodH-Index: 7
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1 CitationsSource
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#1Ethan Porter (GW: George Washington University)H-Index: 4
#2Thomas Wood (OSU: Ohio State University)H-Index: 7
2 Citations
What accounts for voter attitudes toward taxes and government spending? The tax literature generally assumes that spending is popular and taxes are not. On this view, the widespread practice of earmarking tax revenues for specific expenditures serves a means of overcoming voter opposition to taxes: the earmark makes the benefits of government spending more salient to voters evaluating the tax. This paper posits that the standard model overlooks an important factor affecting voter attitudes towar...
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#1Ethan Porter (GW: George Washington University)H-Index: 4
#2Thomas Wood (OSU: Ohio State University)H-Index: 7
Last. Babak Bahador (Cant.: University of Canterbury)H-Index: 3
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Can presidential misinformation affect political knowledge and policy views of the mass public, even when that misinformation is followed by a fact-check? We present results from two experiments, c...
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#1Joshua Becker (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 5
#2Ethan Porter (GW: George Washington University)H-Index: 4
Last. Damon Centola (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 18
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Theories in favor of deliberative democracy are based on the premise that social information processing can improve group beliefs. While research on the “wisdom of crowds” has found that information exchange can increase belief accuracy on noncontroversial factual matters, theories of political polarization imply that groups will become more extreme—and less accurate—when beliefs are motivated by partisan political bias. A primary concern is that partisan biases are associated not only with more...
1 CitationsSource
#1Ethan Porter (GW: George Washington University)H-Index: 4
#2Thomas Wood (OSU: Ohio State University)H-Index: 7
Abstract To identify the effects of televised political comedy on the 2016 presidential election, we leverage the change in hosts of two popular shows, The Daily Show and The Colbert Report , and both shows' subsequent ratings declines. By combining granular geographic ratings data with election results, we are able to isolate the shows' effects on the election. For The Daily Show , we find a strong positive effect on Jon Stewart's departure and Trump's vote share. By our estimate, the transitio...
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#1Kimberly GrossH-Index: 9
#2Ethan PorterH-Index: 4
Last. Thomas WoodH-Index: 7
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Field experiments are notoriously difficult to implement when studying media effects. They are often prohibitively expensive, require the cooperation of a nonacademic entity, and measure effects so...
2 CitationsSource
#1Thomas Wood (OSU: Ohio State University)H-Index: 7
#2Ethan Porter (GW: George Washington University)H-Index: 4
Can citizens heed factual information, even when such information challenges their partisan and ideological attachments? The “backfire effect,” described by Nyhan and Reifler (Polit Behav 32(2):303–330. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11109-010-9112-2, 2010), says no: rather than simply ignoring factual information, presenting respondents with facts can compound their ignorance. In their study, conservatives presented with factual information about the absence of Weapons of Mass Destruction in Iraq bec...
52 CitationsSource
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