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Jennifer S. Brach
University of Pittsburgh
157Publications
43H-index
8,833Citations
Publications 157
Newest
Published on Apr 4, 2018in Journal of Housing for The Elderly
Jennifer S. Brach43
Estimated H-index: 43
(University of Pittsburgh),
Gustavo J. Almeida12
Estimated H-index: 12
(University of Pittsburgh)
+ 3 AuthorsBethany Barone Gibbs11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of Pittsburgh)
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Published on Jan 1, 2018in Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine
Andrea L. Hergenroeder7
Estimated H-index: 7
(University of Pittsburgh),
Bethany Barone Gibbs11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of Pittsburgh)
+ 3 AuthorsJennifer S. Brach43
Estimated H-index: 43
(University of Pittsburgh)
Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate accuracy of research activity monitors in measuring steps in older adults with a range of walking abilities. Method: Participants completed an initial assessment of gait speed. The accuracy of each monitor to record 100 steps was assessed across two walking trials. Results: In all, 43 older adults (age 87 ± 5.7 years, 81.4% female) participated. Overall, the StepWatch had the highest accuracy (99.0% ± 1.5%), followed by the ActivPAL (93.7% ± 11.1%)...
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Published on Nov 21, 2018in Journal of Aging and Physical Activity 2.04
Andrea L. Hergenroeder7
Estimated H-index: 7
,
Bethany Barone Gibbs11
Estimated H-index: 11
+ 3 AuthorsJennifer S. Brach43
Estimated H-index: 43
The aim of this study was to evaluate accuracy of seven commercial activity monitors in measuring steps in older adults with varying walking abilities and to assess monitor acceptability and usability. Forty-three participants (age = 87 ± 5.7 years) completed a gait speed assessment, two walking trials while wearing the activity monitors, and questionnaires about usability features and activity monitor preferences. The Accusplit AX2710 Accelerometer Pedometer had the highest accuracy (93.68% ± 1...
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Published on Nov 1, 2018in Contemporary Clinical Trials 2.66
Christopher N. Sciamanna30
Estimated H-index: 30
,
Noel H. Ballentine1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Pennsylvania State University)
+ 19 AuthorsSusan L. Greenspan (Pennsylvania State University)
Abstract Approximately one-third of older adults fall each year and fall-related injuries are a leading cause of death and disability among this rapidly expanding age group. Despite the availability of bisphosphonates to reduce fractures, concerns over side effects have dramatically reduced use, suggesting that other treatment options are needed. Though many smaller studies have shown that physical activity programs can reduce falls, no study has been adequately powered to detect a reduction in ...
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Published on Nov 1, 2018
Mary P. Kotlarczyk4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Pittsburgh),
Andrea L. Hergenroeder7
Estimated H-index: 7
(University of Pittsburgh)
+ 3 AuthorsJennifer S. Brach43
Estimated H-index: 43
(University of Pittsburgh)
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Published on Dec 6, 2018in Journal of Aging and Health 2.13
Subashan Perera44
Estimated H-index: 44
(University of Pittsburgh),
Neelesh K. Nadkarni11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of Pittsburgh)
+ 2 AuthorsJennifer S. Brach43
Estimated H-index: 43
(University of Pittsburgh)
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Published on Mar 1, 2017in Journal of Aging and Health 2.13
Bethany Barone Gibbs11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of Pittsburgh),
Jennifer S. Brach43
Estimated H-index: 43
(University of Pittsburgh)
+ 7 AuthorsJohn M. Jakicic64
Estimated H-index: 64
(University of Pittsburgh)
Objective: To compare the effects of behavioral interventions targeting decreased sedentary behavior versus increased moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA) in older adults. Method: Inactive older adults (N = 38, 68 ± 7 years old, 71% female) were randomized to 12-week interventions targeting decreased sedentary behavior (Sit Less) or increased MVPA (Get Active). The SenseWear armband was used to objectively assess activity in real time. Assessments included a blinded armband, t...
10 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2017in Computers in Biology and Medicine 2.12
Zhenwei Zhang (University of Pittsburgh), Jessie M. VanSwearingen33
Estimated H-index: 33
(University of Pittsburgh)
+ 2 AuthorsErvin Sejdi2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Pittsburgh)
Human gait is a complex interaction of many nonlinear systems and stride intervals exhibiting self-similarity over long time scales that can be modeled as a fractal process. The scaling exponent represents the fractal degree and can be interpreted as a biomarker of relative diseases. The previous study showed that the average wavelet method provides the most accurate results to estimate this scaling exponent when applied to stride interval time series. The purpose of this paper is to determine t...
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Published on May 1, 2017in Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 4.16
Shachi Tyagi8
Estimated H-index: 8
(University of Pittsburgh),
Subashan Perera2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Pittsburgh),
Jennifer S. Brach43
Estimated H-index: 43
(University of Pittsburgh)
Objectives To examine the effect of self-reported daytime sleepiness on performance-based balance measures and self-reported balance confidence in community-dwelling older adults. Design Cross-sectional secondary analysis of an observational cohort study designed to develop and refine measures of balance and mobility in community-dwelling older adults. Setting Community. Participants Older adults (aged 78.2 ± 5.9) (n = 120). Measurements The performance-based gait and balance measures included g...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 1, 2017
Jennifer S. Brach43
Estimated H-index: 43
,
Subashan Perera44
Estimated H-index: 44
+ 4 AuthorsD. Brodine
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