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Robert C. Hornik
University of Pennsylvania
PsychologyPopulationMass mediaMedicineSocial psychology
168Publications
40H-index
6,747Citations
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Publications 178
Newest
#1Jiaying Liu (UGA: University of Georgia)H-Index: 22
#1Jiaying Liu (UGA: University of Georgia)H-Index: 5
Last. Robert C. Hornik (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 40
view all 5 authors...
Electronic cigarette use among youth and young adults has reached an epidemic proportion of growth. This study examined the direct and indirect effects of the breadth of media scanning about e-ciga...
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#1Elissa C. Kranzler (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 2
#2Ralf Schmälzle (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 13
Last. Emily B. Falk (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 25
view all 5 authors...
Source
#1Jiaying Liu (UGA: University of Georgia)H-Index: 22
#1Jiaying Liu (UGA: University of Georgia)H-Index: 5
Last. Robert C. Hornik (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 40
view all 7 authors...
1 CitationsSource
#1Stella J. Lee (Harvard University)H-Index: 3
#2Jiaying Liu (UGA: University of Georgia)H-Index: 22
Last. Robert C. Hornik (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 40
view all 4 authors...
ABSTRACTElectronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are a controversial public health topic due to their increasing popularity among youth and the uncertainty about their risks and benefits. Researchers h...
Source
#1Laura A. Gibson (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 9
#2Leeann Siegel (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 1
Last. Robert C. Hornik (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 40
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Exposure to media content can shape public opinions about tobacco. Accurately describing content is a first step to showing such effects. Historically, content analyses have hand-coded tobacco-focu...
2 CitationsSource
#1Elissa C. Kranzler (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 2
#2Robert C. Hornik (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 40
Though previous evaluations of “The Real Cost” anti-smoking campaign demonstrate effects on anti-smoking beliefs and behaviors, results rely on self-reported recall as a measure of exposure and are...
Source
#1Qinghua Yang (TCU: Texas Christian University)H-Index: 6
#2Jiaying Liu (UGA: University of Georgia)H-Index: 22
Last. Robert C. Hornik (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 40
view all 4 authors...
ABSTRACTYouth and young adults (YYAs) are vulnerable populations for e-cigarette use or vaping. This study examined the effect of YYAs’ health information seeking behavior (HISB) around e-cigarette use and vaping on their subsequent vaping behavior. We conducted a nationally representative longitudinal phone survey of 13–25 year olds from June 2014 to September 2016, with 2,413 respondents who completed a baseline and follow-up survey six months later. The results from lagged logistic regression...
6 CitationsSource
#1Angeline Sangalang (UD: University of Dayton)H-Index: 7
#2Allyson C. Volinsky (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 2
Last. Robert C. Hornik (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 40
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Once a target audience and a health behavior of interest are selected for a potential mass media campaign, the next task is selecting beliefs about the health behavior to serve as the basis for campaign message content. For novel health behaviors, such as the use of emerging tobacco products, limited empirical research on beliefs about these behaviors exists. A multimethod approach was applied to generate potential campaign beliefs for emerging behaviors. Three methods were conducted in this inv...
1 CitationsSource
#1Robert C. Hornik (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 40
#2Allyson C. Volinsky (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 2
Last. Andy S.L. Tan (Harvard University)H-Index: 15
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ABSTRACTHornik and Woolf (1999) proposed using cross-sectional survey data to prioritize beliefs to address with communication campaign messages. The empirical component of the approach combines evidence of (1) association of beliefs with intentions and (2) current level of beliefs to calculate a “percentage to gain” as the potential promise of a belief. However, the method relies on cross-sectional data; its conclusions are open to challenge. Here, a panel study assesses whether the calculated ...
Source
#1Laura GibsonH-Index: 12
Last. Robert C. HornikH-Index: 40
view all 6 authors...
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