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Priti Pradhan Shah
University of Minnesota
13Publications
7H-index
983Citations
Publications 13
Newest
Published on Mar 1, 2019in Organization Science3.26
Mary M. Maloney5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of St. Thomas (Minnesota)),
Priti Pradhan Shah7
Estimated H-index: 7
(UMN: University of Minnesota)
+ 1 AuthorsStephen L. Jones (UW: University of Washington)
This paper introduces the concept of tie vitality, which indicates the durability and accessibility of team member connections after a team has disbanded as an additional measure of team effectiven...
Published on Jan 1, 2016in Journal of Applied Psychology5.07
Stephen L. Jones6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UMN: University of Minnesota),
Priti Pradhan Shah7
Estimated H-index: 7
Extant trust research champions 3 different centers of action that determine perceptions of trust: the trustor (the individual rendering trust judgments), the trustee (the party being trusted), and the trustor-trustee dyad. We refer to the centers of action as loci of trust. Thus far, researchers have investigated determinants residing within each locus independently but have not concurrently investigated all 3 loci. Thus, the relative influence of each locus on perceptions of trust is unknown. ...
Published on Jan 1, 2015
Mary M. Maloney5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of St. Thomas (Minnesota)),
Mary E. Zellmer-Bruhn17
Estimated H-index: 17
,
Priti Pradhan Shah7
Estimated H-index: 7
Abstract Purpose In this chapter we develop a conceptual model describing how global teams do more than accomplish discrete tasks, and create “spillover coordination” effects by influencing the amount of work-related direct contact among team members outside the task boundaries of the team. We theorize that spillover coordination is the result of relational and cognitive social capital developed through team interaction. We also propose that the design of the team and the context in which it ope...
Published on Feb 1, 2014in Organization Science3.26
Priti Pradhan Shah7
Estimated H-index: 7
(UMN: University of Minnesota),
John P. Bechara3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Tilburg University)
+ 4 AuthorsBarbara R. Spurrier5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Mayo Clinic)
Time is a ubiquitous but often omitted variable in career selection decisions. This study investigates the impact of temporal elements on career selection decisions, thus advancing our understanding of both career decision making and the impact of timing on decision making. We investigate the influence of timing and duration of experience with career options on career selection decisions in an archival study using medical residents’ rotation schedules. We also investigate factors that mitigate t...
Published on Aug 1, 2010
Mary M. Maloney5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of St. Thomas (Minnesota)),
Priti Pradhan Shah7
Estimated H-index: 7
,
Mary E. Zellmer-Bruhn17
Estimated H-index: 17
This paper investigates the role project teams play in intra-organizational network formation. We find that team membership creates networks remaining long after the team disbands. Our study advances both teams and network research by illustrating how teams act as conduits for network formation.
Published on May 1, 2006in Journal of Organizational Behavior5.00
Priti Pradhan Shah7
Estimated H-index: 7
(UMN: University of Minnesota),
Kurt T. Dirks23
Estimated H-index: 23
(WashU: Washington University in St. Louis),
Norman L. Chervany23
Estimated H-index: 23
(UMN: University of Minnesota)
This study examines how both strong and weak relationship groups (groups with numerous, intense internal friendship ties and few, less intense internal friendship ties respectively) achieve high performance when utilizing strategies that capitalize on the strengths and minimizing the weaknesses associated with their internal social structure. We examine the interactions of groups' internal friendship networks with their external network structures (external ties) and internal intragroup conflict...
Published on Jan 1, 2003
Priti Pradhan Shah7
Estimated H-index: 7
,
Kurt T. Dirks23
Estimated H-index: 23
Social networks provide the architecture to facilitate important socio-emotional and task related exchanges within groups. However, researchers have just begun to explore how relationships form in groups comprised of individuals who differ on one or more dimensions. This paper investigates the role of social categorization and social network theories on the formation of social networks within diverse groups. We suggest that each perspective offers an alternative, but incomplete, understanding of...
Published on Aug 1, 2001
Kurt T. Dirks23
Estimated H-index: 23
,
Priti Pradhan Shah7
Estimated H-index: 7
,
Norman L. Chervany23
Estimated H-index: 23
Existing research and practice has advocated that strong interpersonal relationships among teammates are an important foundation for high group performance. This study examines how both strong (i.e., groups with numerous friendship ties) and weak relationship groups (i.e.,groups with few friendship ties) are capable of high performance if they utilize strategies that are appropriate for their social structures. Specifically, we use a social network perspective to examine how groups may perform w...
Published on Feb 1, 2000in Academy of Management Journal7.19
Priti Pradhan Shah7
Estimated H-index: 7
(UMN: University of Minnesota)
Downsizing disrupts existing social networks in organizations. Layoff survivors' reactions to losses of both friends and coworkers in similar structural positions (structural equivalents) are examined here. A field study conducted in a consumer electronics firm revealed negative reactions to the loss of friends and positive reactions to the loss of coworkers in similar structural positions. The loss of friends weakened survivors' network centrality, but the loss of structural equivalents benefit...
Published on Jan 1, 2000in Journal of Applied Psychology5.07
Holly A. Schroth6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of California, Berkeley),
Priti Pradhan Shah7
Estimated H-index: 7
This study examined the effects of procedural justice on state-dependent self-esteem using the group-value model and attribution theory to present competing theoretical perspectives. The group-value model predicts a positive relationship between self-esteem and fair procedures. In contrast, attribution theory suggests procedural fairness interacts with outcome favorability to influence self-esteem. Thus, fair procedures will result in higher self-esteem ratings than unfair procedures when the ou...
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