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Thomas W. Kuyper
Wageningen University and Research Centre
199Publications
40H-index
6,122Citations
Publications 206
Newest
#1Janna M. Barel (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 3
#2Thomas W. Kuyper (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 40
Last.Gerlinde B. De Deyn (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 26
view all 4 authors...
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#1Chunjie Li (CAU: China Agricultural University)H-Index: 1
#2Ellis Hoffland (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 33
Last.Wopke van der Werf (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 26
view all 8 authors...
Abstract Intercropping is known to increase the efficiency of land use, but no meta-analysis has so far been made on the yield gain of intercropping compared to sole cropping in terms of absolute yield per unit area. Yield gain could potentially be related to a relaxation of competition, due to complementarity or facilitation, and/or to the competitive dominance of the higher yielding species. The contributions of competitive relaxation and dominance were here estimated using the concepts of com...
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#1Joana Bergmann (FU: Free University of Berlin)H-Index: 5
#2Alexandra Weigelt (Leipzig University)H-Index: 41
Last.Liesje Mommer (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 35
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Plant economics run on carbon and nutrients instead of money. Leaf strategies aboveground span an economic spectrum from ‘live fast and die young’ to ‘slow and steady’, but the economy defined by root strategies belowground remains unclear. Here we take a holistic view of the belowground economy, and show that root-mycorrhizal collaboration can short circuit a one-dimensional economic spectrum, providing an entire space of economic possibilities. Root trait data from 1,781 species across the glo...
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#1Xinxin Wang (CAU: China Agricultural University)H-Index: 1
#2Hongbo LiH-Index: 6
Last.Z. Rengel Ac (UWA: University of Western Australia)H-Index: 56
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Background and aims Plasticity of plants refers to their ability to produce different phenotypes in different environments. Plants show plasticity aboveground as well as belowground. The influence of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) symbiosis on root plasticity is poorly known. This study aimed to quantify plasticity of root-system related, morphological, physiological or mycorrhizal traits along a soil phosphorus (P) supply gradient.
Source
#1Ming Lang (CAU: China Agricultural University)
#2Shuikuan Bei (CAU: China Agricultural University)
Last.Junling Zhang (CAU: China Agricultural University)
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Much effort has been directed towards increasing the availability of soil residual phosphorus (P). However, little information is available for the P fertilization-induced biotic P legacy and its mediation of plant P uptake. We collected microbial inocula from a monoculture maize field site with a 10-year P-fertilization history. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to investigate whether bacterial communities, as a result of different P-fertilization history (nil P, 33 and/or 131 kg P kg ha-1 ...
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#1Franz Sebastian Krah (TUM: Technische Universität München)H-Index: 1
#2Ulf Büntgen (University of Cambridge)H-Index: 48
Last.Claus Bässler (TUM: Technische Universität München)H-Index: 26
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Thermal melanism theory states that dark-colored ectotherm organisms are at an advantage at low temperature due to increased warming. This theory is generally supported for ectotherm animals, however, the function of colors in the fungal kingdom is largely unknown. Here, we test whether the color lightness of mushroom assemblages is related to climate using a dataset of 3.2 million observations of 3,054 species across Europe. Consistent with the thermal melanism theory, mushroom assemblages are ...
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#1Chunjie Li (CAU: China Agricultural University)H-Index: 1
#2Thomas W. Kuyper (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 40
Last.Ellis Hoffland (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 33
view all 7 authors...
Aims The phosphorus (P) resource partitioning hypothesis assumes that dissimilarity in P acquisition traits among plant species leads to enhanced P uptake by crop combinations compared with their sole crops. We developed and implemented a test for this hypothesis.
3 CitationsSource
#1Clara P. Peña-Venegas (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 2
#2Thomas W. Kuyper (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 40
Last.Maarja Öpik (UT: University of Tartu)H-Index: 31
view all 8 authors...
Manioc (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is an important tropical crop that depends on arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) association for its nutrition. However, little is known about the richness and species composition of AM fungal communities associating with manioc and possible differences across soils and manioc landraces. We studied the diversity and composition of AM fungal communities present in the roots of different manioc landraces and surrounding soils in indigenous shifting cultivation fields on ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Janna M. Barel (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 3
#2Thomas W. Kuyper (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 40
Last.Gerlinde B. De Deyn (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 26
view all 4 authors...
Aims Roots contribute greatly to carbon cycling in agriculture. Measuring aboveground litter decomposition could approximate belowground turn-over if drivers of decomposition, f.e. litter traits and plant presence, influence shoot and root decomposition in a comparable manner. We tested coordination of above- and belowground litter traits and decomposition rates for six pairs of crops and closely related wild plants and studied the influence of plant presence on decomposition.
1 CitationsSource
#1Xin Xin Wang (CAU: China Agricultural University)H-Index: 1
#2Ellis Hoffland (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 33
Last.Thomas W. Kuyper (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 40
view all 5 authors...
Plant-soil feedback (PSF) describes the process whereby plant species modify the soil environment, which subsequently impacts the growth of the same or another plant species. Our aim was to explore PSF by two maize varieties (a landrace and a hybrid variety) and three arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) species (Funneliformis mosseae, Claroideoglomus etunicatum, Gigaspora margarita, and the mixture). We carried out a pot experiment with a conditioning and a feedback phase to determine PSF with di...
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