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Kimberly F. Wallin
University of Vermont
34Publications
12H-index
613Citations
Publications 34
Newest
#1Marina Golivets (UVM: University of Vermont)H-Index: 1
#2Christopher W. Woodall (USFS: United States Forest Service)H-Index: 32
Last.Kimberly F. Wallin (UVM: University of Vermont)H-Index: 12
view all 3 authors...
1. The number and rate of non‐native plant invasions in forests have been steadily increasing over the last century with profound consequences for the composition, structure and functioning of these ecosystems. While multiple regional, landscape and local environmental factors are known to drive the spread of non‐native invasive plant species (NNIPS) into forests, such factors have rarely been analysed within a unified analytical framework allowing for the assessment of their relative importance...
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#1Sara Helms Cahan (UVM: University of Vermont)H-Index: 17
#2Lucia C. Orantes (UVM: University of Vermont)H-Index: 3
Last.Carlota MonroyH-Index: 16
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Abstract Chagas disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and transmitted by triatomine insect vectors. In Guatemala, insecticide spraying is an integral part of management of the main vector, Triatoma dimidiata. Spraying typically has low efficacy, which may be due to incomplete elimination from infested houses, within-village dispersal, or influx from other villages or sylvan environments. To evaluate how these mechanisms contribute to reinfestation, we conducted a time-cou...
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#1Lucia C. Orantes (UVM: University of Vermont)H-Index: 3
#2Carlota Monroy (Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala)H-Index: 16
Last.Sara Helms Cahan (UVM: University of Vermont)H-Index: 17
view all 11 authors...
Chagas disease, considered a neglected disease by the World Health Organization, is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, and transmitted by >140 triatomine species across the Americas. In Central America, the main vector is Triatoma dimidiata, an opportunistic blood meal feeder inhabiting both domestic and sylvatic ecotopes. Given the diversity of interacting biological agents involved in the epidemiology of Chagas disease, having simultaneous information on the dynamics of the pa...
6 CitationsSource
#1Kayla I. Perry (Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center)H-Index: 6
#2Kimberly F. Wallin (UVM: University of Vermont)H-Index: 12
Last.Daniel A. Herms (Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center)H-Index: 31
view all 4 authors...
2 CitationsSource
#1Marina Golivets (UVM: University of Vermont)H-Index: 1
#2Kimberly F. Wallin (UVM: University of Vermont)H-Index: 12
High competitive ability has often been invoked as a key determinant of invasion success and ecological impacts of non-native plants. Yet our understanding of the strategies that non-natives use to gain competitive dominance remains limited. Particularly, it remains unknown whether the two non-mutually exclusive competitive strategies, neighbour suppression and neighbour tolerance, are equally important for the competitive advantage of non-native plants. Here, we analyse data from 192 peer-revie...
6 CitationsSource
Leucopis argenticollis (Zetterstedt) and Leucopis piniperda (Malloch) are known to feed on the lineage of Adelges tsugae Annand that is native to western North America, but it is not known if they will survive on the lineage that was introduced from Japan to the eastern USA. In 2014, western Leucopis spp. larvae were brought to the laboratory and placed on A. tsugae collected in either Washington (North American A. tsugae lineage) or Connecticut (Japanese lineage). There were no significant diff...
4 CitationsSource
#1Darrell W. Ross (OSU: Oregon State University)H-Index: 14
#2Glenn R. Kohler (DOS: United States Department of State)H-Index: 2
Last.Kimberly F. Wallin (UVM: University of Vermont)H-Index: 12
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As part of a comprehensive study to survey predators associated with hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand, 1928 in the Pacific Northwest (PNW), U.S.A. (Kohler et al. 2008), predators of balsam woolly adelgid, Adelges piceae (Ratzeburg, 1844) and Cooley spruce gall adelgid, Adelges cooleyi (Gillette, 1907) (all Hemiptera: Adelgidae) were sampled on nine dates from June 2005 to October 2006 on a small number of trees. Samples were collected every 6–8 weeks. Predators were collected from t...
2 CitationsSource
#1Kayla I. Perry (Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center)H-Index: 6
#2Kimberly F. Wallin (UVM: University of Vermont)H-Index: 12
Last.Daniel A. Herms (Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center)H-Index: 31
view all 4 authors...
A major knowledge gap exists in understanding dispersal potential of ground-dwelling arthropods, especially in forest ecosystems. Movement of the ground-dwelling arthropod community was quantified using a novel mark-capture technique in which three different colored fluorescent powders in two separate mixtures were applied to the floor of a deciduous forest in concentric bands 3, 8, and 15 m from the center of 30 × 30 m experimental plots. The majority (67.1%) of ground-dwelling arthropods did n...
2 CitationsSource
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