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Kristopher Kyle
Georgia State University
34Publications
11H-index
369Citations
Publications 34
Newest
#1Scott A. Crossley (GSU: Georgia State University)H-Index: 29
#2Stephen Skalicky (GSU: Georgia State University)H-Index: 5
Last.Katia Monteiro (GSU: Georgia State University)H-Index: 1
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A number of longitudinal studies of L2 production have reported frequency effects wherein learners' produce more frequent words as a function of time. The current study investigated the spoken output of English L2 learners over a four-month period of time using both native and non-native English speaker frequency norms for both word types and word tokens. The study also controlled for individual differences such as first language distance, English proficiency, gender, and age. Results demonstrat...
1 CitationsSource
#1Cynthia M. Berger (GSU: Georgia State University)H-Index: 3
#2Scott A. Crossley (GSU: Georgia State University)H-Index: 29
Last.Kristopher KyleH-Index: 11
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A large data set of L1 psycholinguistic norms (Balota et al. 2007) was used to assess spoken L2 English lexical proficiency in cross-sectional and longitudinal learner corpora. Behavioral norms included lexical decision and word naming latencies (i.e. reaction times) and accuracies for 40,481 English words. A frequency measure was included to compare the relative strength of the norms to a traditional lexical measure when explaining proficiency and growth. The cross-sectional study revealed that...
2 CitationsSource
#1James Garner (UF: University of Florida)H-Index: 1
#2Scott A. Crossley (GSU: Georgia State University)H-Index: 29
Last.Kristopher KyleH-Index: 11
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Abstract Productive knowledge of English phraseology can assist second language writers in composing more effective and target-like texts. As such, researchers have taken a great interest in L2 phraseological competence by comparing the use of multi-word sequences by L2 writers with that of native speakers as well as comparing the use of multi-word sequences of L2 writers from different proficiency levels. This study expands on this research by investigating how multi-word sequence use can predi...
Source
#1Scott A. Crossley (GSU: Georgia State University)H-Index: 29
#2Kristopher KyleH-Index: 11
Last.Mihai Dascalu (Politehnica University of Bucharest)H-Index: 14
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This article introduces the second version of the Tool for the Automatic Analysis of Cohesion (TAACO 2.0). Like its predecessor, TAACO 2.0 is a freely available text analysis tool that works on the Windows, Mac, and Linux operating systems; is housed on a user’s hard drive; is easy to use; and allows for batch processing of text files. TAACO 2.0 includes all the original indices reported for TAACO 1.0, but it adds a number of new indices related to local and global cohesion at the semantic level...
Source
#1Scott A. CrossleyH-Index: 29
#2Kristopher KyleH-Index: 11
Last.Ute RömerH-Index: 18
view all 3 authors...
2 CitationsSource
#1Katia Monteiro (GSU: Georgia State University)H-Index: 1
#2Scott A. Crossley (GSU: Georgia State University)H-Index: 29
Last.Kristopher KyleH-Index: 11
view all 3 authors...
Source
#1Scott A. Crossley (GSU: Georgia State University)H-Index: 29
#2Kristopher KyleH-Index: 11
Abstract Tool Tool for the Automatic Analysis of Lexical Sophistication (TAALES). Tool Purpose To calculate a wide range of classic and newly developed indices of lexical sophistication (e.g., frequency, range, academic register, concreteness and familiarity, psycholinguistic word properties, and semantic network norms). Key Premise Lexical sophistication features are strong predictors of writing quality in both first language (L1) and second language (L2) contexts. Research Connections Inspired...
1 CitationsSource
#1YouJin KimH-Index: 16
#2Scott A. CrossleyH-Index: 29
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To date, a growing number of studies in instructed second language acquisition (SLA) have investigated the effects of task repetition on L2 performance (e.g., complexity, accuracy, fluency) as well as on the occurrence of interaction-driven learning opportunities (e.g., Bygate, 2001; Fukuta, 2016; Kim & Tracy-Ventura, 2013). However, studies have not investigated how repeating different aspects of tasks (e.g., content or procedure) during collaborative tasks affects second language lexical use. ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Kristopher KyleH-Index: 11
#2Scott A. Crossley (GSU: Georgia State University)H-Index: 29
Syntactic complexity is an important measure of second language (L2) writing proficiency (Larsen–Freeman, 1978; Lu, 2011). Large‐grained indices such as the mean length of T‐unit (MLTU) have been used with the most consistency in L2 writing studies (Ortega, 2003). Recently, indices such as MLTU have been criticized, both for the difficulty in interpretation (e.g., Norris & Ortega, 2009) and for a potentially misplaced focus on clausal subordination (e.g., Biber, Gray, & Poonpon, 2011). In this a...
5 CitationsSource
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