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Andrew Simpson
University of Essex
38Publications
14H-index
808Citations
Publications 38
Newest
Abstract What helps children learn: is it a presence of a live teacher or an interaction with the learning materials? Addressing this question, we manipulated a teacher's presence (on-screen vs. present) and activity (observing vs. doing) while teaching children about the properties of geometric shapes. Five-year-olds (n=215) completed two shape-sorting tasks in which they distinguished between typical, atypical and non-valid shapes. In between these tasks, they took part in one of four training...
#1Andrew Simpson (University of Essex)H-Index: 14
#2Daniel J. Carroll (University of Sheffield)H-Index: 10
Inhibitory control is the capacity to suppress inappropriate responses. It is regarded as a unitary construct, central to executive function and effortful control, as well as many aspects of child development. There are, nevertheless, significant gaps in our understanding of inhibition’s early development, and several robust findings that remain hard to explain. These findings are outlined, and a new perspective on inhibitory control presented, which explains them by distinguishing between two w...
#1Katarzyna Kostyrka-Allchorne ('KCL': King's College London)H-Index: 2
#2Nicholas R. Cooper (University of Essex)H-Index: 18
Last.Andrew Simpson (University of Essex)H-Index: 14
view all 5 authors...
ABSTRACTWe investigated the immediate consequences of differently paced videos on behaviour and neural activity during response inhibition. Forty 7-year-olds watched a fast- or slow-paced video and completed a go/no-go task. Compared to the slow-paced-video group, children in the fast-paced-video group made more no-go errors. There was also an interaction between pace and no-go response type (correct, wrong) for the N2 and P3 peak latencies. In the slow-paced group, both components peaked earlie...
#1Andrew Simpson (University of Essex)H-Index: 14
#2Reshaa Al Ruwaili (University of Essex)H-Index: 1
Last.Kevin Riggs (University of Hull)H-Index: 2
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Previous research shows that the development of response inhibition and drawing skill are linked. The current research investigated whether this association reflects a more fundamental link between response inhibition and motor control. In Experiment 1, 3- and 4-year-olds (n = 100) were tested on measures of inhibition, fine motor control, and drawing skill. Data revealed an association between inhibition and fine motor control, which was responsible for most of the association observed with dra...
#1Katarzyna Kostyrka-Allchorne ('KCL': King's College London)H-Index: 2
#2Nicholas R. Cooper (University of Essex)H-Index: 18
Last.Andrew Simpson (University of Essex)H-Index: 14
view all 3 authors...
This study examined the influence of the realism (realistic vs. unrealistic) and pace (slow vs. fast), in a video of an actor reading a story, on 4-year-old children’s attention and response inhibition. After establishing baseline cognitive performance, 187 children watched novel videos that manipulated realism and pace, while keeping other programme features constant. Irrespective of the pace, watching the videos which presented unrealistic stories improved children’s response inhibition. For a...
#1Mark A. Atkinson (University of Exeter)H-Index: 5
#2Abbie C. Millett (University of Essex)H-Index: 1
Last.Geoff G. Cole (University of Essex)H-Index: 18
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A number of studies have shown that the motor actions of one individual can affect the attention of an observer. In one notable example, “social inhibition of return,” observers are relatively slow to initiate a response to a location where another individual has just responded. In the present article we examine the degree to which this phenomenon can be considered a social effect. We find that unlike the related social, or “joint,” Simon effect, social inhibition of return is not influenced by ...
#1Mark A. Atkinson (University of Exeter)H-Index: 5
#2Andrew Simpson (University of Essex)H-Index: 14
Last.Geoff G. Cole (University of Essex)H-Index: 18
view all 3 authors...
Despite considerable interest in both action perception and social attention over the last 2 decades, there has been surprisingly little investigation concerning how the manual actions of other humans orient visual attention. The present review draws together studies that have measured the orienting of attention, following observation of another’s goal-directed action. Our review proposes that, in line with the literature on eye gaze, action is a particularly strong orienting cue for the visual ...
#1Amanda K. Holland (Goldsmiths, University of London)H-Index: 2
#2Grace Hyde (University of Essex)H-Index: 2
Last.Andrew Simpson (University of Essex)H-Index: 14
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Abstract To become skilled artifact users, children must learn the actions and functions associated with artifacts. We investigated preschoolers’ ability to fast map an action, function and name associated with a novel artifact, and retain the new mapping long term following brief incidental exposure to the artifact being used. In Experiment 1, 3- and 5-year-olds ( N = 144) were tested 1 week after two exposures to a novel action, function, and name. Participants performed well on comprehension ...
#1Andrew Simpson (University of Essex)H-Index: 14
#2Daniel J. Carroll (University of Sheffield)H-Index: 10
This article investigates the process of task conceptualization, through which participants turn the instructions on a task into a mental representation of that task. We provide the first empirical evidence that this process of conceptualization can directly influence the inhibitory demands of a task. Data from Experiments 1 and 2 (both n = 24) suggested that robust difficulties on inhibitory tasks can be overcome if preschoolers conceptualize the tasks in a way that avoids the need for inhibito...
#1Andrew Simpson (University of Essex)H-Index: 14
#2Marielle Upson (University of Essex)H-Index: 1
Last.Daniel J. Carroll (University of Sheffield)H-Index: 10
view all 3 authors...
Abstract Understanding the processes that make responses prepotent is central to understanding the role of inhibitory control in cognitive development. The question of what makes responses prepotent was investigated using the two most widely studied measures of preschoolers’ inhibitory control. Across two experiments, 80 children were tested either on a series of stimulus–response compatibility (SRC) tasks or on a series of Go/No-go tasks. Results indicated that high levels of prepotency on SRC ...
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