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Ori Swed
Texas Tech University
SociologyPolitical sciencePopulationPublic relationsEconomic growth
14Publications
3H-index
41Citations
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Publications 14
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#1Ori Swed (TTU: Texas Tech University)H-Index: 3
#2Daniel Burland (University of Saint Mary)
Corporate privatization of security has generated a neoliberal iteration of an old profession: the private military contractor. This development has revolutionized security policies across the glob...
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#1Ori Swed (TTU: Texas Tech University)H-Index: 3
#2Connor M. Sheehan (SC: University of Southern California)H-Index: 9
Last. John Sibley Butler (University of Texas at Austin)H-Index: 16
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The digital divide's implications on health inequality among American Military veterans has been discussed extensively in research; however, it remains unclear what is the association between Internet usage and health specifically among Veterans. We examine this question by addressing the growing digital gaps in the veteran population, looking at the association of Internet use and self-reported health. Using the National Survey of Veterans we find that compared to those who use the Internet dai...
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#1Ori Swed (TTU: Texas Tech University)H-Index: 3
#2Jae Kwon (University of Texas at Austin)
Last. Thomas CrosbieH-Index: 6
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From an obscure sector synonymous with mercenaryism, the private military and security industry has grown to become a significant complementing instrument in military operations. This rise has brou...
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#1Ori Swed (TTU: Texas Tech University)H-Index: 3
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#1John Sibley Butler (University of Texas at Austin)H-Index: 16
#2Bryan Stephens (Duke University)H-Index: 2
Last. Ori Swed (TTU: Texas Tech University)H-Index: 3
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Over the last few decades, private military and security companies (PMSCs) have publicly transformed from mercenaries to contractors in a process which legitimized heavy-handed use of PMSCs in military operations around the globe and fueled massive industry growth. Yet, despite their increasing importance in military affairs and foreign policy, we know next to nothing about the individual men and women who serve their country as military contractors in PMSCs. To fill this gap, this chapter provi...
1 CitationsSource
#1Ori Swed (TTU: Texas Tech University)H-Index: 3
#2Thomas CrosbieH-Index: 6
In this chapter, we will discuss three trendlines which echo and expand upon the studies presented in this volume. The first theme of “state and power” is grounded in the Weberian philosophy of the state as the legitimate monopoly of the means of violence and the corollaries of outsourcing this function. It examines the modern state and the new civil-military relations that emerged with the wide use of PMSCs. The second theme, “military sociology”, focuses on the implications of the introduction...
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#1Thomas CrosbieH-Index: 6
#2Ori Swed (TTU: Texas Tech University)H-Index: 3
This volume seeks to reconsider the sociology of security, paying particular attention to the changing ways in which security shifts from public to private control. This introduction is intended to extend the individual arguments of the contributors’ chapters in order to make a general case for more sociological engagement with this important but often elusive development. We first ask why anyone needs a sociology of security, then consider the ways in which privatized security intersects with k...
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#1Ori SwedH-Index: 3
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From an obscure sector synonymous with mercenaryism, the private military and security industry has grown to become a significant complementing instrument in military operations. This rise has brought with it considerable attention. Researchers have examined the role of private military and security companies in international relations as well as the history of these companies, and, above all, the legal implications of their use in place of military organizations. As research progresses, a signi...
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#1Ori Swed (TTU: Texas Tech University)H-Index: 3
Abstract Can international nongovernmental organizations (INGO) mitigate human rights violations when armed conflict ensues? There is a reason to believe that the harsh conditions of war, which destabilize society and incite nationalist and militarist notions, would prevent the work of INGO from being effective. However, world polity scholarship suggests that regardless of these conditions INGOs can improve human rights standards. INGOs are one of the principal and most effective vehicles for th...
1 CitationsSource
#1Ori Swed (University of Texas at Austin)H-Index: 3
#2Thomas CrosbieH-Index: 6
Though private military and security companies (PMSCs) have been addressed extensively in the literature, little research has been done on the contractors themselves, leaving us in the dark as to who these individuals are. In this article, we focus on the critical case of the United States armed services and argue that two broad developments have been converging that both point to the need for new, microlevel sociological research on the people who are involved in the global PMSC industry. To th...
7 CitationsSource
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