Match!
Katia Levecque
Ghent University
111Publications
16H-index
963Citations
Publications 111
Newest
Published on Dec 31, 2019
Katia Levecque16
Estimated H-index: 16
,
Elena Ronda-Pérez7
Estimated H-index: 7
+ 1 AuthorsFernando G. Benavides34
Estimated H-index: 34
Published on May 1, 2017in Research Policy5.42
Katia Levecque16
Estimated H-index: 16
(UGent: Ghent University),
Frederik Anseel21
Estimated H-index: 21
(UGent: Ghent University)
+ 2 AuthorsLydia Gisle7
Estimated H-index: 7
Research policy observers are increasingly concerned about the potential impact of current academic working conditions on mental health, particularly in PhD students. The aim of the current study is threefold. First, we assess the prevalence of mental health problems in a representative sample of PhD students in Flanders, Belgium (N = 3659). Second, we compare PhD students to three other samples: (1) highly educated in the general population (N = 769); (2) highly educated employees (N = 592); an...
Published on Jan 2, 2017in Disability & Society1.61
Josephine Foubert1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UGent: Ghent University),
Katia Levecque16
Estimated H-index: 16
(UGent: Ghent University),
Ronan Van Rossem25
Estimated H-index: 25
(UGent: Ghent University)
People with a chronic condition tend to report poorer subjective well-being than people without. This article examines the dependence of the relationship on doing paid and voluntary work, and on macro-level labour market exclusion of people with and without chronic conditions. Data from the European Quality of Life Survey (2011–2012) of people aged between 25 and 65 are analysed using multilevel regression techniques. A chronic condition has a stronger negative effect on subjective well-being fo...
Published on May 11, 2016in Gedrag & Organisatie0.21
Lieze Stassen1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UGent: Ghent University),
Frederik Anseel21
Estimated H-index: 21
,
Katia Levecque16
Estimated H-index: 16
(UGent: Ghent University)
Published on Jan 1, 2016in Gedrag & Organisatie0.21
Lieze Stassen1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Frederik Anseel21
Estimated H-index: 21
,
Katia Levecque16
Estimated H-index: 16
This article provides a commentary of Lub and Van der Smissen's (2016) response to the article 'Generational differences in the workplace: A systematic analysis of a myth'. We first discuss the aim of the original article, followed by the objections raised by Lub and Van der Smissen. Further, we discuss the added value for practice, and we advocate for a better comprehension on the origin of thinking in terms of generations. Finally, we try to explain why people hold on to such myths.
Published on Jan 1, 2016
Lieze Stassen1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Katia Levecque16
Estimated H-index: 16
,
Frederik Anseel21
Estimated H-index: 21
12345678910