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Bernt-Erik Sæther
Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Population sizeEcologyPopulationDensity dependenceBiology
281Publications
63H-index
13.2kCitations
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Publications 249
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#1Alina K. Niskanen (NTNU: Norwegian University of Science and Technology)H-Index: 1
#2Anna Maria Billing (NTNU: Norwegian University of Science and Technology)H-Index: 6
Last. Thomas Kvalnes (NTNU: Norwegian University of Science and Technology)H-Index: 8
view all 16 authors...
Inbreeding may increase the extinction risk of small populations. Yet, studies using modern genomic tools to investigate inbreeding depression in nature have been limited to single populations, and little is known about the dynamics of inbreeding depression in subdivided populations over time. Natural populations often experience different environmental conditions and differ in demographic history and genetic composition, characteristics that can affect the severity of inbreeding depression. We ...
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#1Endre Grüner Ofstad (NTNU: Norwegian University of Science and Technology)H-Index: 1
#2Stine Svalheim Markussen (NTNU: Norwegian University of Science and Technology)H-Index: 3
Last. Ivar Herfindal (NTNU: Norwegian University of Science and Technology)H-Index: 23
view all 8 authors...
Landscape changes are happening at an unprecedented pace, and together with high levels of wildlife harvesting humans have a large effect on wildlife populations. A thorough knowledge of their combined influence on individual fitness is important in order to understand factors affecting population dynamics. The goal of the study was to assess the individual consistency in the use of risky habitat types, and how habitat use was related to fitness components and life-history strategies. Using data...
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#1Lara Veylit (NTNU: Norwegian University of Science and Technology)
#2Bernt-Erik Sæther (NTNU: Norwegian University of Science and Technology)H-Index: 63
Last. Marlène Gamelon (NTNU: Norwegian University of Science and Technology)H-Index: 12
view all 5 authors...
From current theories on life-history evolution, fast early-life growth to reach early reproduction in heavily hunted populations should be favored despite the possible occurrence of mortality costs later on. However, fast growth may also be associated with better individual quality and thereby lower mortality, obscuring a clear trade-off between early-life growth and survival. Moreover, fast early-life growth can be associated with sex-specific mortality costs related to resource acquisition an...
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#1Christoffer Høyvik Hilde (NTNU: Norwegian University of Science and Technology)H-Index: 1
#2Marlène Gamelon (NTNU: Norwegian University of Science and Technology)H-Index: 12
Last. Christophe Pélabon (NTNU: Norwegian University of Science and Technology)H-Index: 30
view all 6 authors...
In (st)age-structured populations, the long-run population growth rate is negatively affected by temporal variation in vital rates. In most cases, natural selection should minimize temporal variation in the vital rates to which the long-run population growth is most sensitive, resulting in demographic buffering. By reviewing empirical studies on demographic buffering in wild populations, we found overall support for this hypothesis. However, we also identified issues when testing for demographic...
1 CitationsSource
AbstractMany species show synchronous fluctuations in population size over large geographical areas, which are likely to increase their regional extinction risk. Here we examine how the degree of spatial synchrony in population dynamics is affected by trophic interactions using a two-species predator-prey model with spatially correlated environmental noise. We show that the predator has a larger spatial scale of population synchrony than the prey if the population fluctuations of both species ar...
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#1Aline Magdalena Lee (NTNU: Norwegian University of Science and Technology)H-Index: 9
#2Bernt-Erik Sæther (NTNU: Norwegian University of Science and Technology)H-Index: 63
Last. Steinar Engen (NTNU: Norwegian University of Science and Technology)H-Index: 40
view all 3 authors...
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#1Aline Magdalena Lee (NTNU: Norwegian University of Science and Technology)H-Index: 9
#2Ane Marlene Myhre (NTNU: Norwegian University of Science and Technology)H-Index: 3
Last. Bernt-Erik Sæther (NTNU: Norwegian University of Science and Technology)H-Index: 63
view all 10 authors...
Levels of random genetic drift are influenced by demographic factors, such as mating system, sex ratio and age structure. The effective population size (Ne ) is a useful measure for quantifying genetic drift. Evaluating relative contributions of different demographic factors to Ne is therefore important to identify what makes a population vulnerable to loss of genetic variation. Until recently, models for estimating Ne have required many simplifying assumptions, making them unsuitable for this t...
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#1Håkon Holand (NTNU: Norwegian University of Science and Technology)H-Index: 5
#2Thomas KvalnesH-Index: 8
Last. Jouko KumpulaH-Index: 21
view all 6 authors...
Stabilizing selection is thought to be common in wild populations and act as one of the main evolutionary mechanisms, which constrain phenotypic variation. When multiple traits interact to create a combined phenotype, correlational selection may be an important process driving adaptive evolution. Here, we report on phenotypic selection and evolutionary changes in two natal traits in a semidomestic population of reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) in northern Finland. The population has been closely mon...
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#1Jonatan F. Marquez (NTNU: Norwegian University of Science and Technology)
#2Aline Magdalena Lee (NTNU: Norwegian University of Science and Technology)H-Index: 9
Last. Bernt-Erik Sæther (NTNU: Norwegian University of Science and Technology)H-Index: 63
view all 7 authors...
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#1Brage Bremset Hansen (NTNU: Norwegian University of Science and Technology)H-Index: 13
#2Åshild Ønvik Pedersen (NPI: Norwegian Polar Institute)H-Index: 10
Last. Ronny Aanes (NPI: Norwegian Polar Institute)H-Index: 20
view all 9 authors...
3 CitationsSource
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