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David Peris
James I University
28Publications
9H-index
216Citations
Publications 28
Newest
#1Enrique Peñalver (Instituto Geológico y Minero de España)H-Index: 18
#2Antonio Arillo (Complutense University of Madrid)H-Index: 16
Last.Ricardo Pérez-de la Fuente (University of Oxford)H-Index: 10
view all 8 authors...
The originally published version of this Article was updated shortly after publication to add the word ‘Ticks’ to the title, following its inadvertent removal during the production process. This has now been corrected in both the PDF and HTML versions of the Article.
#1David Peris (University of Barcelona)H-Index: 9
#2Fabrizio FantiH-Index: 3
Abstract A new soldier beetle (Coleoptera: Cantharidae), Molliberus albae gen. et sp. nov., is described and illustrated from the El Soplao Lower Cretaceous (lower Albian) amber deposit in northern Spain. This is the first fossil species in the family to be described from the Spanish amber and the oldest representative in Europe. The new species shows affinities with the Late Cretaceous (early Cenomanian) species from Myanmar, and the fossil is compared with the other Cretaceous fossil species. ...
#2Xavier Delclòs (University of Barcelona)H-Index: 19
Last.Enrique Peñalver (Instituto Geológico y Minero de España)H-Index: 18
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Amber is an organic multicompound derivative from the polymerization of resin of diverse higher plants. Compared with other modes of fossil preservation, amber records the anatomy of and ecological interactions between ancient soft-bodied organisms with exceptional fidelity. However, it is currently suggested that ambers do not accurately record the composition of arthropod forest paleocommunities, due to crucial taphonomic biases. We evaluated the effects of taphonomic processes on arthropod en...
#1Enrique Peñalver (Instituto Geológico y Minero de España)H-Index: 18
#2Antonio Arillo (Complutense University of Madrid)H-Index: 16
Last.Ricardo Pérez-de la Fuente (University of Oxford)H-Index: 10
view all 8 authors...
Ticks are currently among the most prevalent blood-feeding ectoparasites, but their feeding habits and hosts in deep time have long remained speculative. Here, we report direct and indirect evidence in 99 million-year-old Cretaceous amber showing that hard ticks and ticks of the extinct new family Deinocrotonidae fed on blood from feathered dinosaurs, non-avialan or avialan excluding crown-group birds. A †Cornupalpatum burmanicum hard tick is entangled in a pennaceous feather. Two deinocrotonids...
#1David Peris (James I University)H-Index: 9
#2G.Y. Lyubarsky (MSU: Moscow State University)H-Index: 2
Last.Evgeny E. PerkovskyH-Index: 13
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The Cretaceous new species and genus Albocryptophagus cantabricus gen. et sp. n. is described based on a fossil specimen from the El Soplao amber deposit (Spain). The new genus is similar to the extant genera Cryptophagus and Micrambe, but differs from them in the transverse pedicel, anterior angles of pronotum, pronotal margin unmodified, pronotal pits absent and distance between metacoxae is 1/5 the width of the coxa. Albocryptophagus gen. n. is the undoubtedly the most ancient representative ...
#1Paweł Jałoszyński (AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 10
#2Vincent Perrichot (CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique)H-Index: 21
Last.David Peris (James I University)H-Index: 9
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Abstract Among insects, the largest group of the Animal Kingdom, rove beetles (Staphylinidae) have undergone an enormous adaptive radiation that resulted in over 62,000 extant species showing diverse body forms, structures and feeding specializations combining predaceous, mycophagous, saprophagous and phytophagous habits in one family. The morphology of extinct and extant species is well studied, but the evolutionary history of such a broad range of adaptations is scarcely documented in the foss...
#1David Peris (James I University)H-Index: 9
#2Conrad C. Labandeira (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 44
Last.Ricardo Pérez-de la Fuente (Harvard University)H-Index: 10
view all 6 authors...
ABSTRACTAbundant gymnosperm pollen grains associated with the oedemerid beetle Darwinylus marcosi Peris, 2016 were found in Early Cretaceous amber from Spain. This discovery provides confirmatory evidence for a pollination mutualism during the mid Mesozoic for the family Oedemeridae (Coleoptera), which today is known to pollinate only angiosperms. As a result, this new record documents a lateral host-plant transfer from an earlier gymnosperm to a later angiosperm, indicating that pollination of ...
#1David Peris (University of Barcelona)H-Index: 9
The taxonomic position of a new pollen-feeding fossil beetle from Spanish amber (late Albian, 105 Ma) is analysed. A phylogenetic analysis allows me to accommodate Darwinylus marcosi gen. et sp. nov. in the Polyphaga: Oedemeridae within current limits for the family, which clearly belongs in the subfamily Oedemerinae. It corresponds to the oldest definitive record for the family. Some autapomorphies, mainly in antennae, are observable in the fossil compared with extant members of the family. A d...
#1David Peris (James I University)H-Index: 9
#2Ricardo Pérez-de la Fuente (Harvard University)H-Index: 10
Last.Conrad C. Labandeira (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 44
view all 6 authors...
Summary During the mid-Cretaceous, angiosperms diversified from several nondiverse lineages to their current global domination [1], replacing earlier gymnosperm lineages [2]. Several hypotheses explain this extensive radiation [3], one of which involves proliferation of insect pollinator associations in the transition from gymnosperm to angiosperm dominance. However, most evidence supports gymnosperm–insect pollinator associations, buttressed by direct evidence of pollen on insect bodies, curren...
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