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Wayne A. Grove
Le Moyne College
29Publications
9H-index
390Citations
Publications 29
Newest
#1Wayne A. GroveH-Index: 9
#2Michael Jetter (UWA: University of Western Australia)H-Index: 7
Last.Kerry L. PappsH-Index: 12
view all 3 authors...
#1Wayne A. GroveH-Index: 9
#2Michael JetterH-Index: 7
Last.Kerry L. PappsH-Index: 12
view all 3 authors...
Are people prone to selecting occupations with highly skewed income distributions despite minuscule chances of success? Assembling a comprehensive pool of potential teenage entrants into professional tennis (a typical winner-take-all market), we construct objective measures of relative ability and earnings projections. We find that prospective tennis professionals are attracted to right-skewed earnings distributions, independent of mean and variance. If skewness in prize money fell to zero, male...
#1Weiwei Chen (FIU: Florida International University)H-Index: 2
#2Wayne A. Grove (Le Moyne College)H-Index: 9
Last.Andrew Hussey (U of M: University of Memphis)H-Index: 9
view all 3 authors...
Increasingly researchers include information about noncognitive abilities in their analyses of similar people’s educational choices and subsequent labor market outcomes. We contribute to this literature by considering the dual roles of confidence in one’s abilities and noncognitive skills and characteristics in predicting several subsequent MBA program and employment outcomes among a sample of GMAT test takers, with a focus on identifying possible gender differences in these relationships. Self-...
#1Wayne A. Grove (Le Moyne College)H-Index: 9
#2Michael Jetter (UWA: University of Western Australia)H-Index: 7
We estimate the relationship between international youth and professional tennis rankings. We find no difference between the predictiveness of rankings from age 14 & Under versus age 16 & Under competitions. The most persistent predictor of professional success is beating older top ranked juniors. Our results reveal stark gender differences. For example, ordinal junior rankings are more strongly associated with professional success for males than for females. In addition, future tennis stars are...
#1Wayne A. Grove (Le Moyne College)H-Index: 9
#2Andrew Hussey (U of M: University of Memphis)H-Index: 9
A large literature has focused on estimating the returns to schooling and has typically done so by incorporating institutional heterogeneity in quality along merely one dimension (such as average SAT scores). Using longitudinal survey data of registrants for the GMAT exam and school level information from other sources, we create, in the context of graduate management education, multiple indices of school quality, and estimate the effect of these quality measures on multiple indicators of career...
#1Wayne A. Grove (Le Moyne College)H-Index: 9
#2Andrew Hussey (U of M: University of Memphis)H-Index: 9
We consider the “mismatch” hypothesis in the context of graduate management education. Both blacks and Hispanics, conditional on a rich set of human capital variables, prior earnings and work experience, and non-cognitive attributes, are favored in admission to top 50 Master of Business Administration (MBA) programs. To test for mismatch effects, we provide two comparisons: (1) comparable individuals (in terms of race, gender, and credentials) at different quality MBA programs and (2) individual...
#1Bryan Caplan (GMU: George Mason University)H-Index: 20
#2Eric Crampton (Cant.: University of Canterbury)H-Index: 8
Last.Ilya Somin (GMU: George Mason University)H-Index: 10
view all 4 authors...
Many scholars argue that "retrospective voting" is a powerful information shortcut that offsets widespread voter ignorance. Even relatively ignorant voters, it is claimed, can punish incumbents for bad performance and reward them if things go well. But if voters' understanding of which officials are responsible for which issues is systematically biased, retrospective voting becomes an independent source of political failure rather than a cure for it. We designed and administered a new survey of ...
#1Weiwei Chen (U of M: University of Memphis)H-Index: 2
#2Wayne A. Grove (Le Moyne College)H-Index: 9
Last.Andrew Hussey (U of M: University of Memphis)H-Index: 9
view all 3 authors...
Many studies find a notable return to college quality. Dale and Krueger (2002, 2011) only do until they address selection bias concerns by proxying for ambition and by matching students with similar admission outcomes but different matriculation decisions. Although we employ similar methodologies to Dale and Krueger, we find substantial returns to MBA program selectivity.
#1Wayne A. Grove (Le Moyne College)H-Index: 9
#2Andrew Hussey (U of M: University of Memphis)H-Index: 9
While a substantial literature has established returns to college major and to school quality, we offer the first such estimates for Master's of Business Administration (MBAs). To control for their nonrandom selection of fields, we estimate the returns to MBA concentrations using both ordinary least squares (OLS) with detailed control variables and including individual fixed effects. We find approximately 7% returns for most MBAs but roughly double that for finance and management information sys...
#1Wayne A. Grove (Le Moyne College)H-Index: 9
#2Andrew Hussey (U of M: University of Memphis)H-Index: 9
Last.Michael Jetter (UWA: University of Western Australia)H-Index: 7
view all 3 authors...
Focused on human capital, economists typically explain about half of the gender earnings gap. For a national sample of MBAs, we account for 82 percent of the gap by incorporating noncognitive skills (for example, confidence and assertiveness) and preferences regarding family, career, and jobs. Those two sources of gender heterogeneity account for a quarter of the “explained” pay gap, with half due to human capital variables and the other quarter due to hours worked and current job characteristic...
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