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Christopher Jasparro
Naval War College
Drainage basinWater securityEconomic growthWater resource managementPolitics
20Publications
5H-index
88Citations
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Publications 21
Newest
ABSTRACTThe protection, destruction, utilization and manipulation of cultural property and material heritage, especially archaeological sites and artifacts, by state and non-state actors has become...
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Transnational terrorism in the age of globalization is often viewed as a diffuse phenomenon unbounded by geography. A review of violent Sunni Islamist extremists (i.e. “jihadist”) terrorist attacks against the United States' homeland between 1990 and 2012, however, reveals specific spatial characteristics. Indeed, there has been considerable geographical consistency in the loci of command and control, and target selection. Different cell types also exhibit distinct geographical patterns and pref...
1 CitationsSource
#1Jonathan Taylor (CSUF: California State University, Fullerton)H-Index: 6
#2Christopher Jasparro (Naval War College)H-Index: 5
Last. Kevin Mattson (CSUF: California State University, Fullerton)H-Index: 1
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The United Nations estimates that the illegal drug trade accounts for 1.5 percent of all money transiting through the global financial system (UNODC 2011). A quick perusal of a list of major drug-producing countries demonstrates a correlation with violent and longstanding conflict. The U.S., as the largest drug-consuming country, also has the dubious distinction of the highest incarceration rates in the world. The illegal drug trade is clearly integral to our understanding of contemporary geopol...
10 CitationsSource
#1Robert G. WirsingH-Index: 2
#2Daniel C. StollH-Index: 1
Last. Christopher JasparroH-Index: 5
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PART I: FUNDAMENTALS OF RIVER RIVALRY IN HIMALAYAN ASIA Water Insecurity in Himalayan Asia Challenge of Climate Change in Himalayan Asia PART II: SOURCES OF TRANS-BOUNDARY RIVER DISPUTES Damming the Rivers-I: The Irrigation Imperative Damming the Rivers-II: The Energy Imperative Damming the Rivers-III: The Diversion Imperative PART III: ALTERNATIVES TO WATER CONFLICT Cooperative River Basin Management Water Technology Innovation PART IV: THE FUTURE OF HIMALAYAN ASIA'S RIVERS Conclusion: Swimming...
13 CitationsSource
#1Robert G. Wirsing (Georgetown University)H-Index: 1
#2Daniel C. Stoll (Georgetown University)H-Index: 1
Last. Christopher Jasparro (Naval War College)H-Index: 5
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Scientists and policy makers are fast approaching unanimity that a fresh-water crisis is in progress the world over. Both the severity of this crisis and its content vary widely among the world’s regions, sub-regions, and countries, and there is intense debate over its causes and reversibility. No longer much debated, however, is whether the crisis exists. On the contrary, its huge scale, potentially calamitous consequences, and imminent dangers to the political stability and security of the pla...
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#1Robert G. Wirsing (Georgetown University)H-Index: 1
#2Daniel C. Stoll (Georgetown University)H-Index: 1
Last. Christopher Jasparro (Naval War College)H-Index: 5
view all 3 authors...
The authors of this book have striven to present an objective account of international rivalry over river resources in Himalayan Asia. The intensity of conflict has been neither overstated nor understated. Pains have been taken to examine in detail the main drivers of conflict under the labels of irrigation, energy, and diversion imperatives. Additionally, attention has been given to the puzzlingly complex impact on the region’s water resources of climate change; and, by taking a look at three c...
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#1Robert G. Wirsing (Georgetown University)H-Index: 1
#2Daniel C. Stoll (Georgetown University)H-Index: 1
Last. Christopher Jasparro (Naval War College)H-Index: 5
view all 3 authors...
There is now general and widespread agreement among scientists that the Earth’s climate is changing and warming primarily due to human activities — particularly the release of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. According to the German Advisory Council on Global Change, “without resolute counteraction, a global increase in temperature of 2–7 degrees Celsius (°C) relative to pre-industrial levels can be expected by 2100”1, while greenhouse gases (GHGs) already released in...
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#1Robert G. Wirsing (Georgetown University)H-Index: 1
#2Daniel C. Stoll (Georgetown University)H-Index: 1
Last. Christopher Jasparro (Naval War College)H-Index: 5
view all 3 authors...
To continue with our examination of the problem of reaching amicable interstate agreement on water resource exploitation among co-riparian states, we explore in this chapter the diversion imperative. By this we refer specifically to the drive in two countries of Himalayan Asia — China and India — to overcome marked regional disparities in freshwater availability by tapping into river waters in water-surplus parts of the country and redistributing these waters via massive infrastructural diversio...
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#1Robert G. Wirsing (Georgetown University)H-Index: 1
#2Daniel C. Stoll (Georgetown University)H-Index: 1
Last. Christopher Jasparro (Naval War College)H-Index: 5
view all 3 authors...
This chapter continues our broadly focused consideration of the problem of reaching an amicable interstate agreement on water-resource exploitation among co-riparian states. Specifically, it explores the interstate political dynamics of the energy imperative. By energy imperative we mean the increasingly pressing realization of national leaders in Himalayan Asia that their countries’ indigenous hydrocarbon energy supplies, oil and natural gas in particular, fall far short of future requirements;...
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#1Robert G. Wirsing (Georgetown University)H-Index: 1
#2Daniel C. Stoll (Georgetown University)H-Index: 1
Last. Christopher Jasparro (Naval War College)H-Index: 5
view all 3 authors...
Chapter 6 ended with the somewhat wintry observation that regional circumstances in Himalayan Asia, including asymmetrical power configurations, persistent animosities and distrust, competing national security agendas, and unsettled international political conditions, while not precluding efforts aimed at cooperative regional management of water resources would certainly act to impose severe handicaps upon them. Fortunately, none of these circumstances rules out the possibility that there exists...
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