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Liana C. Sayer
University of Maryland, College Park
37Publications
17H-index
4,348Citations
Publications 37
Newest
#1Leah Ruppanner (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 9
#2Stephanie Moller (UNCC: University of North Carolina at Charlotte)H-Index: 18
Last.Liana C. Sayer (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 17
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This study investigates the relationship between maternal employment and state-to-state differences in childcare cost and mean school day length. Pairing state-level measures with an individual-lev...
#1Maria StanforsH-Index: 10
#2Liana C. Sayer (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 17
#1Joanna Pepin (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 4
#2Liana C. Sayer (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 17
Last.Lynne M. Casper (SC: University of Southern California)H-Index: 20
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Assumptions that single mothers are “time poor” compared with married mothers are ubiquitous. We tested theorized associations derived from the time poverty thesis and the gender perspective using the 2003–2012 American Time Use Surveys (ATUS). We found marital status differentiated housework, leisure, and sleep time, but did not influence the amount of time that mothers provided childcare. Net of the number of employment hours, married mothers did more housework and slept less than never-marrie...
#1Emily J. PassiasH-Index: 1
#2Liana C. Sayer (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 17
Last.Joanna Pepin (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 4
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The authors used the 2003 to 2012 American Time Use Survey to examine marital status variation in mothers' leisure time. They found that never-married mothers have more total leisure but less high-quality leisure when compared with married mothers. Never-married mothers' leisure is concentrated in passive and socially isolated activities that offer fewer social and health benefits. Black single mothers have the highest amount of socially isolated leisure, particularly watching television alone. ...
#1Leah Ruppanner (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 9
#2Liana C. Sayer (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 17
#1Paula England (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 46
#2Paul D. Allison (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 46
Last.Liana C. Sayer (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 17
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The authors assessed how the relative age of spouses affects whether men or women initiate a divorce, using data from the National Survey of Families and Households. Ex-spouses' reports of who left generally agreed, but not always, so the analysis used a latent class model embedded in an event-history model with competing risks that the woman leaves the man or the man leaves the woman. Support was not found for the hypothesis that age heterogamy itself increases the odds of divorce: Even large a...
#1Yue Qian (OSU: Ohio State University)H-Index: 7
#2Liana C. Sayer (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 17
Economic, political, and demographic transformations are occurring in East Asian societies, driven by industrialization, urbanization, and closer integration into world markets (Vogel, 1993). These forces have increased women's educational and employment opportunities, but the gendered division of labor remains stubbornly entrenched (Oshio, Nozaki, & Kobayashi, 2013). What may have changed in East Asian societies is women's perceptions of the fairness of unequal divisions of labor and their alte...
#1Liana C. Sayer (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 17
Women’s and men’s time use is more similar today than it was in the 1960s, when specialization in adult roles was at its peak, but convergence remains stubbornly out of sight. This chapter updates earlier trend studies of time use and finds that recent data confirm the most consistent findings from earlier analyses. The greater similarity of women’s and men’s time use today is due much more to changes among women than among men. Further, despite declines in women’s housework time, the increase i...
#1Liana C. Sayer (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 17
#2Vicki A. Freedman (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 41
Last.Suzanne M. Bianchi (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 47
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Do gendered time use patterns among older adults mirror those observed in earlier life stages? Or does time use allocation in later life become less gendered as life stages are reoriented away from paid work and raising children toward new pursuits? Later life disability and increased likelihood of living alone in young and older adulthood may alter the activities in which individuals engage, the amount of time spent on various activities, and time socializing and interacting with others. “Produ...
#1Paula England (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 46
#2Paul D. Allison (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 46
Last.Liana C. Sayer (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 17
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AbstractOBJECTIVEWe examine whether having an affair around the time a marriage broke up is associated with being the person who wanted the divorce more or the person who was left. We also examine predictors of having an affair around the end of the marriage.METHODSWe use the National Survey of Families and Households, using each ex-spouse's reports of which spouse wanted the divorce more and whether either was having an affair around the end of the marriage. We combine latent class models with ...
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