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Juan D. Daza
Sam Houston State University
49Publications
15H-index
551Citations
Publications 49
Newest
#1Nicholas T. Holovacs (SHSU: Sam Houston State University)H-Index: 1
#2Juan D. Daza (SHSU: Sam Houston State University)H-Index: 15
Last.Ricardo MonteroH-Index: 8
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Source
#1Brendan J. Pinto (Marquette University)H-Index: 3
#2James Titus-McQuillan (UTA: University of Texas at Arlington)H-Index: 1
Last.Tony Gamble (Marquette University)H-Index: 20
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#1Aaron H. Griffing (Marquette University)H-Index: 1
#2Thomas J. Sanger (LUC: Loyola University Chicago)H-Index: 3
Last.Tony Gamble (Marquette University)H-Index: 20
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Source
#1Cristian Hernández Morales (University of Valle)H-Index: 1
#2Pedro L. V. Peloso (Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi)H-Index: 9
Last.Juan D. Daza (SHSU: Sam Houston State University)H-Index: 15
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1 CitationsSource
#1Stuart V. NielsenH-Index: 6
#2Juan D. DazaH-Index: 15
Last.Tony GambleH-Index: 20
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Investigating the evolutionary processes influencing the origin, evolution, and turnover of vertebrate sex chromosomes requires the classification of sex chromosome systems in a great diversity of species. Among amniotes, squamates (lizards and snakes) - and gecko lizards in particular - are worthy of additional study. Geckos possess all major vertebrate sex-determining systems, as well as multiple transitions among them, yet we still lack data on the sex-determining systems for the vast majorit...
1 CitationsSource
#1Juan D. DazaH-Index: 15
#2Aaron M. BauerH-Index: 40
Last.J. B. LososH-Index: 1
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We report the discovery of a new genus and species of amber-preserved lizard from the mid-Cretaceous of Myanmar. The fossil is one of the smallest and most complete Cretaceous lizards ever found, preserving both the articulated skeleton and remains of the muscular system and other soft tissues. Despite its completeness, its state of preservation obscures important diagnostic features. We determined its taxonomic allocation using two approaches: we used previously identified autapomorphies of squ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Andrea Villa (UNITO: University of Turin)H-Index: 7
#2Juan D. Daza (SHSU: Sam Houston State University)H-Index: 15
Last.Massimo Delfino (UNITO: University of Turin)H-Index: 21
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2 CitationsSource
#1Corentin Bochaton (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 1
#2Juan D. Daza (SHSU: Sam Houston State University)H-Index: 15
Last.Arnaud Lenoble (University of Bordeaux)H-Index: 2
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Abstract Squamate remains from fossil-bearing deposits are difficult to identify on the basis of their morphology, because their modern relatives lack osteological description. In addition, intraspecific morphological variability of modern taxa is mostly understudied, making taxonomic identification of subfossil bones even more difficult. The aim of this study was to investigate osteological differences between two sympatric gecko species, Thecadactylus rapicauda and Hemidactylus mabouia, both c...
1 CitationsSource
#1Aaron M. Bauer (Villanova University)H-Index: 40
#2Mallika Beach-Mehrotra (SHSU: Sam Houston State University)H-Index: 1
Last.James R. Willett (SHSU: Sam Houston State University)H-Index: 1
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The Peruvian sphaerodactyl gecko, Pseudogonatodes barbouri, is among the smallest reptile species in South America. Morphological information about this species, or even the genus, is limited. In this study, we produced a bone-by-bone description from the skull and atlantoaxial complex to contribute new phenotypic information about this poorly known lizard. To achieve this objective, we employed a divide-and-conquer approach in which each author digitally isolated one or two bones from the skull...
1 CitationsSource
#1Andrej Cernansky (Comenius University in Bratislava)H-Index: 10
#2Juan D. Daza (SHSU: Sam Houston State University)H-Index: 15
Last.Aaron M. Bauer (Villanova University)H-Index: 40
view all 3 authors...
New species of a gecko of the genus Euleptes is described here—E. klembarai. The material comes from the middle Miocene (Astaracian, MN 6) of Slovakia, more precisely from the well-known locality called Zapfe`s fissure fillings (Devinska Nova Ves, Bratislava). The fossil material consists of isolated left maxilla, right dentary, right pterygoid and cervical and dorsal vertebrae. The currently known fossil record suggests that isolation of environment of the Zapfe`s fissure site, created a refugi...
1 CitationsSource
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