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Una Strand Viðarsdóttir
University of Iceland
AnatomySubsistence agriculturePrehistorySchmorl's nodesBiology
6Publications
6H-index
263Citations
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Publications 8
Newest
#1Kimberly A. Plomp (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 4
#2Keith Dobney (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 35
Last. Mark Collard (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 33
view all 5 authors...
Recently we proposed an evolutionary explanation for a spinal pathology that afflicts many people, intervertebral disc herniation (Plomp et al. [2015] BMC Evolutionary Biology 15, 68). Using 2D data, we found that the bodies and pedicles of lower vertebrae of pathological humans were more similar in shape to those of chimpanzees than were those of healthy humans. Based on this, we hypothesized that some individuals are more prone to intervertebral disc herniation because their vertebrae exhibit ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Kimberly A. Plomp (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 4
#2Una Strand Viðarsdóttir (University of Iceland)H-Index: 6
Last. Mark Collard (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 33
view all 5 authors...
Abstract A number of putative adaptations for bipedalism have been identified in the hominin spine. However, it is possible that some have been overlooked because only a few studies have used 3D and these studies have focused on cervical vertebrae. With this in mind, we used geometric morphometric techniques to compare the 3D shapes of three thoracic and two lumbar vertebrae of Homo sapiens, Pan troglodytes, Gorilla gorilla, and Pongo pygmaeus. The study had two goals. One was to confirm the exi...
1 CitationsSource
#1Kimberly A. Plomp (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 4
#2Una Strand Viðarsdóttir (University of Iceland)H-Index: 6
Last. Mark Collard (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 16
view all 5 authors...
Background: Recent studies suggest there is a relationship between intervertebral disc herniation and vertebral shape. The nature of this relationship is unclear, however. Humans are more commonly afflicted with spinal disease than are non-human primates and one suggested explanation for this is the stress placed on the spine by bipedalism. With this in mind, we carried out a study of human, chimpanzee, and orangutan vertebrae to examine the links between vertebral shape, locomotion, and Schmorl...
12 CitationsSource
#1Charlotte L. King (Durham University)H-Index: 7
#2R. Alexander Bentley (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 26
Last. Geoff Nowell (Durham University)H-Index: 35
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Three prehistoric sites in the Upper Mun River Valley of north-eastern Thailand have provided a detailed chronological succession comprising 12 occupation phases. These represent occupation spanning 2300 years, from initial settlement in the Neolithic (seventeenth century BC) through to the Iron Age, ending in the seventh century AD with the foundation of early states. The precise chronology in place in the Upper Mun River Valley makes it possible to examine changes in social organisation, techn...
9 CitationsSource
#1Charlotte L. King (Durham University)H-Index: 7
#2R. Alexander Bentley (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 26
Last. Colin G. Macpherson (Durham University)H-Index: 31
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The dramatic growth of dietary isotope studies in archaeological literature attests to the significant potential this technique has for shedding light on past societies. Human diet reflects complex, inter-linked factors such as status, cultural preferences or environmental constraints on food production. In this study dietary isotope analysis is used to examine the human skeletal remains from Ban Non Wat, northeast Thailand. The study aims to use isotopic data to give insight into patterns of mi...
28 CitationsSource
#1Kimberly A. Plomp (Durham University)H-Index: 4
#2Charlotte A. Roberts (Durham University)H-Index: 33
Last. Una Strand Viðarsdóttir (University of Iceland)H-Index: 6
view all 3 authors...
Biomedical Center, University of Iceland, 101 Reykjavik, IcelandKEY WORDS disc herniation; palaeopathology; shape analysis; neural foramen; geometricmorphometricsABSTRACT Schmorl’s nodes are the result of hernia-tions of the nucleus pulposus into the adjacent vertebralbody and are commonly identified in both clinical andarchaeological contexts. The current study aims to iden-tify aspects of vertebral shape that correlate withSchmorl’s nodes. Two-dimensional statistical shape anal-ysis was perform...
16 CitationsSource
#1Todd C. Rae (Durham University)H-Index: 16
#2Una Strand Viðarsdóttir (Durham University)H-Index: 6
Last. A. Theodore SteegmannH-Index: 1
view all 4 authors...
Adaptation to climate occupies a central position in biological anthropology. The demonstrable relationship between temperature and morphology in extant primates (including humans) forms the basis of the interpretation of the Pleistocene hominin Homo neanderthalensis as a cold-adapted species. There are contradictory signals, however, in the pattern of primate craniofacial changes associated with climatic conditions. To determine the direction and extent of craniofacial change associated with te...
31 CitationsSource
#1Una Strand Viðarsdóttir (Durham University)H-Index: 6
#2Paul O'Higgins (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 40
Last. Chris Stringer (Natural History Museum)H-Index: 68
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This study examines interpopulation variations in the facial skeleton of 10 modern human populations and places these in an ontogenetic perspective. It aims to establish the extent to which the distinctive features of adult representatives of these populations are present in the early post natal period and to what extent population differences in ontogenetic scaling and allometric trajectories contribute to distinct facial forms. The analyses utilize configurations of facial landmarks and are ca...
167 CitationsSource
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