Match!
Regina M. Sullivan
New York University
151Publications
52H-index
7,065Citations
Publications 155
Newest
#1Rosemarie E. Perry (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 9
#2Millie Rincón-Cortés (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 8
Last.Regina M. Sullivan (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 52
view all 11 authors...
Abstract It is well-established that children from low income, under-resourced families are at increased risk of altered social development. However, the biological mechanisms by which poverty-related adversities can “get under the skin” to influence social behavior are poorly understood and cannot be easily ascertained using human research alone. This study utilized a rodent model of “scarcity-adversity,” which encompasses material resource deprivation (scarcity) and reduced caregiving quality ...
Source
Sleep quality varies widely across individuals, especially during normal aging, with impaired sleep contributing to deficits in cognition and emotional regulation. Sleep can also be impacted by a variety of adverse events, including childhood adversity. Here we examined how early life adverse events impacted later life sleep structure and physiology using an animal model to test the relationship between early life adversity and sleep quality across the life span. Rat pups were exposed to an Adve...
Source
#1Rosemarie E. Perry (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 9
#2Stephen H. Braren (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 4
Last.Clancy Blair (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 51
view all 9 authors...
It has long been theorized that humans develop higher mental functions, such as executive functions (EFs), within the context of interpersonal interactions and social relationships. Various components of social interactions, such as interpersonal communication, perspective taking, and conforming/adhering to social rules, may create important (and perhaps even necessary) opportunities for the acquisition and continued practice of EF skills. Furthermore, positive and stable relationships facilitat...
Source
Maternal care is profoundly important for mammalian survival, and maternal behaviors can also be expressed by non-biological parents after experience with infants. One critical molecular signal for maternal behavior is oxytocin, a hormone released in the brain by hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Oxytocin enables plasticity within the auditory cortex, a necessary step for responding to infant vocalizations. To determine how this change occurs during natural experience, we continuously ...
Source
Source
#1Charlis RainekiH-Index: 17
#2Maya Opendak (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 4
Last.Regina M. Sullivan (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 52
view all 8 authors...
Infant maltreatment increases vulnerability to physical and mental disorders, yet specific mechanisms embedded within this complex infant experience that induce this vulnerability remain elusive. To define critical features of maltreatment-induced vulnerability, rat pups were reared from postnatal day 8 (PN8) with a maltreating mother, which produced amygdala and hippocampal deficits and decreased social behavior at PN13. Next, we deconstructed the maltreatment experience to reveal sufficient an...
1 CitationsSource
#1Regina M. Sullivan (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 52
Source
#1Regina M. Sullivan (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 52
Source
#1Nim Tottenham (Columbia University)H-Index: 39
#2Mor Shapiro (KP: Kaiser Permanente)H-Index: 1
Last.Regina M. Sullivan (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 52
view all 5 authors...
Attachment-related learning (that is, forming preferences for cues associated with the parent) defies the traditional rules of learning in that it seems to occur independently of apparent reinforcement1—young children prefer cues associated with their parent, regardless of valence (rewarding or aversive), despite the diversity of parenting styles2. This obligatory attraction for parental cues keeps the child nearby and safe to explore the environment; thus, it is critical for survival and sets t...
3 CitationsSource
#1Regina M. Sullivan (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 52
Source
12345678910