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John C. George
University of Guelph
137Publications
24H-index
2,065Citations
Publications 137
Newest
#1Courtney CarothersH-Index: 14
#2Todd SformoH-Index: 11
view all 5 authors...
One of the most pervasive signals of global climate change is altered patterns of distribution with trends towards poleward shifts of species. While habitat loss and destruction has severed connections between people and salmon in many locales, salmon fisheries in the high Arctic are just beginning to develop. To explore these emergent connections, we gathered local knowledge about Pacific salmon and emerging subsistence salmon fisheries in the Beaufort Sea region through ethnographic research i...
#1Mary Ann Raghanti (KSU: Kent State University)H-Index: 20
#2Bridget Wicinski (ISMMS: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai)H-Index: 13
Last.Camilla Butti (ISMMS: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai)H-Index: 16
view all 11 authors...
#1Susan J. Rehorek (SRU: Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 11
#2Rafael Stimmelmayr (UAF: University of Alaska Fairbanks)
Last.J. G. M. Thewissen (NEOMED: Northeast Ohio Medical University)H-Index: 36
view all 6 authors...
#1John J. Citta (Alaska Department of Fish and Game)H-Index: 9
#2Lloyd F. Lowry (UAF: University of Alaska Fairbanks)H-Index: 6
Last.Justin A. Crawford (Alaska Department of Fish and Game)H-Index: 2
view all 26 authors...
Abstract We collated available satellite telemetry data for six species of ice-associated marine mammals in the Pacific Arctic: ringed seals ( Pusa hispida ; n = 118), bearded seals ( Erignathus barbatus, n = 51), spotted seals ( Phoca largha, n = 72), Pacific walruses ( Odobenus rosmarus divergens, n = 389); bowhead whales ( Balaena mysticetus, n = 46), and five Arctic and sub-arctic stocks of beluga whales ( Delphinapterus leucas, n = 103). We also included one seasonal resident, eastern North...
#1Todd Sformo (UAF: University of Alaska Fairbanks)H-Index: 11
#2Billy AdamsH-Index: 1
Last.John C. GeorgeH-Index: 24
view all 10 authors...
Abstract We report the first confirmed cases (2013–2016) of saprolegniosis caused by water mold from the genus Saprolegnia in Aanaakliq, broad whitefish ( Coregonus nasus ), from the Colville River near Nuiqsut, Alaska. While this mold is known to be worldwide, these instances represent the first cases in Nuiqsut and only the second instance on a single fish on the North Slope, occurring in 1980. We describe the collaborative work on monitoring this emerging disease. Because fish constitute a cr...
#1Matthew L. Druckenmiller (CU: University of Colorado Boulder)H-Index: 3
#2John J. Citta (Alaska Department of Fish and Game)H-Index: 9
Last.Lori T. Quakenbush (Alaska Department of Fish and Game)H-Index: 17
view all 6 authors...
Abstract The range of the Bering-Chukchi-Beaufort (BCB) population of bowhead whales ( Balaena mysticetus ) extends across the seasonally ice-covered waters of the Pacific Arctic region. The majority of whales summer in the eastern Beaufort Sea and winter in the Bering Sea, migrating across the Chukchi Sea in fall and spring. As arctic sea-ice extent rapidly diminishes, the increasing length and variability of the open water season is changing bowhead habitat substantially, with many areas now r...
#1J. G. M. Thewissen (NEOMED: Northeast Ohio Medical University)H-Index: 36
#2Tobin L. Hieronymus (NEOMED: Northeast Ohio Medical University)H-Index: 9
Last.Denise McBurney (NEOMED: Northeast Ohio Medical University)H-Index: 12
view all 6 authors...
In utero, baleen whales initiate the development of several dozens of teeth in upper and lower jaws. These tooth germs reach the bell stage and are sometimes mineralized, but toward the end of prenatal life they are resorbed and no trace remains after birth. Around the time that the germs disappear, the keratinous baleen plates start to form in the upper jaw, and these form the food-collecting mechanism. Baleen whale ancestors had two generations of teeth and never developed baleen, and the pren...
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