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Dave Boyle
University of Oxford
10Publications
8H-index
382Citations
Publications 10
Newest
#1Akiko Shoji (University of Oxford)H-Index: 10
#2Stéphane Aris-Brosou (U of O: University of Ottawa)H-Index: 18
Last.Tim Guilford (University of Oxford)H-Index: 40
view all 11 authors...
In order to maximize foraging efficiency in a varying environment, predators are expected to optimize their search strategy. Environmental conditions are one important factor affecting these movement patterns, but variations in breeding constraints (self-feeding vs. feeding young and self-feeding) during different breeding stages (incubation vs. chick-rearing) are often overlooked, so that the mechanisms responsible for such behavioral shifts are still unknown. Here, to test how search patterns ...
8 CitationsSource
#1Annette L. Fayet (University of Oxford)H-Index: 10
#2Robin Freeman (ZSL: Zoological Society of London)H-Index: 22
Last.Tim Guilford (University of Oxford)H-Index: 40
view all 8 authors...
Animals can be flexible in their migration strategies, using several wintering sites or a variety of routes. The mechanisms promoting the development of these migratory patterns and their potential fitness consequences are poorly understood. Here, we address these questions by tracking the dispersive migration of a pelagic seabird, the Atlantic puffin Fratercula arctica, using over 100 complete migration tracks collected over 7 years, including repeated tracks of individuals for up to 6 consecut...
10 CitationsSource
#1Akiko Shoji (University of Oxford)H-Index: 10
#2Stéphane Aris-Brosou (U of O: University of Ottawa)H-Index: 18
Last.Tim Guilford (University of Oxford)H-Index: 40
view all 11 authors...
Inter-seasonal events are believed to connect and affect reproductive performance (RP) in animals. However, much remains unknown about such carry-over effects (COEs), in particular how behaviour patterns during highly mobile life-history stages, such as migration, affect RP. To address this question, we measured at-sea behaviour in a long-lived migratory seabird, the Manx shearwater (Puffinus puffinus) and obtained data for individual migration cycles over 5 years, by tracking with geolocator/im...
13 CitationsSource
#1Akiko ShojiH-Index: 10
#2Kyle H. ElliottH-Index: 25
Last.Tim GuilfordH-Index: 40
view all 6 authors...
Many marine predators coexist at colonies, creating a zone where there could be sig- nificant inter- and intraspecific competition. To minimize the potential for direct competition, under the principle of competitive exclusion, sympatric predators may differ in their foraging be - haviour at the colony. At Skomer, Wales, razorbills Alca torda and puffins Fratercula arctica both breed at the same time of year, forage on sand eels Ammodytes sp. and their populations are sta- ble or declining, mean...
16 CitationsSource
#1Akiko Shoji (University of Oxford)H-Index: 10
#2Ellie Owen (RSPB: Royal Society for the Protection of Birds)H-Index: 8
Last.Tim Guilford (University of Oxford)H-Index: 40
view all 11 authors...
How central-place foragers change search strategy in response to environmental conditions is poorly known. Foragers may vary the total distance travelled and how far they range from the central place in response to variation in the distribution of their prey. One potential reason as to why they would extend the length of their foraging trip and its distance from the colony would be to increase prey quality or quantity, despite incurring higher transit costs. To test this trade-off hypothesis in ...
8 CitationsSource
#2Matthew J.A. WoodH-Index: 66
Last.Chris TaylorH-Index: 1
view all 8 authors...
Skomer Island, Pembrokeshire, Wales is believed to have one of the largest colonies of Manx Shearwaters Puffinus puffinus in the World. In 1998 a census was made of the whole island, and the adjacent islands of Skokholm and Middleholm, in order to try to establish the size of the breeding population; the Skomer population was estimated to be just over 101,000 breeding pairs. A second census was carried out in 2011. First, a set of study burrows was opened and a tape of the male call (normally on...
5 Citations
#1Tim Guilford (University of Oxford)H-Index: 40
#2Robin Freeman (University of Oxford)H-Index: 22
Last.Christopher M. Perrins (Edward Grey Institute of Field Ornithology)H-Index: 45
view all 7 authors...
Navigational control of avian migration is understood, largely from the study of terrestrial birds, to depend on either genetically or culturally inherited information. By tracking the individual migrations of Atlantic Puffins, Fratercula arctica, in successive years using geolocators, we describe migratory behaviour in a pelagic seabird that is apparently incompatible with this view. Puffins do not migrate to a single overwintering area, but follow a dispersive pattern of movements changing thr...
76 CitationsSource
#1Tim GuilfordH-Index: 40
#2Jessica MeadeH-Index: 14
Last.Christopher M. Perrins (Edward Grey Institute of Field Ornithology)H-Index: 45
view all 9 authors...
The migratory movements of seabirds (especially smaller species) remain poorly understood, despite their role as harvesters of marine ecosystems on a global scale and their potential as indicators of ocean health. Here we report a successful attempt, using miniature archival light loggers (geolocators), to elucidate the migratory behaviour of the Manx shearwater Puffinus puffinus , a small (400 g) Northern Hemisphere breeding procellariform that undertakes a trans-equatorial, trans-Atlantic migr...
161 CitationsSource
#1Tim GuilfordH-Index: 40
#2Jessica MeadeH-Index: 14
Last.Christopher M. PerrinsH-Index: 45
view all 9 authors...
6 CitationsSource
#1Tim GuilfordH-Index: 40
#2Jessica MeadeH-Index: 14
Last.Christopher M. Perrins (Edward Grey Institute of Field Ornithology)H-Index: 45
view all 9 authors...
We report the first successful use of miniature Global Positioning System loggers to track the ocean-going behaviour of a c. 400g seabird, the Manx Shearwater Puffinus puffinus. During three field seasons, breeding birds were tracked during the incubation and chick rearing periods on their foraging excursions from the large colony on Skomer Island, Pembrokeshire, UK. Foraging effort was concentrated in the Irish Sea. Likely foraging areas were identified to the north off the Mull of Galloway (so...
79 CitationsSource
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