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Nicholas J. Aebischer
Game & Wildlife Conservation Trust
97Publications
29H-index
4,953Citations
Publications 99
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#1Barbara SmithH-Index: 15
Last.John M. HollandH-Index: 25
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Last.Mark J. WhittinghamH-Index: 40
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#1Nicholas J. Aebischer (Game & Wildlife Conservation Trust)H-Index: 29
The Game and Wildlife Conservation Trust’s National Gamebag Census (NGC) has been collecting voluntary bag returns from shoots across the UK since 1961. Methods similar to the ones used for bird census data are applied to NGC data to derive annual bag indices for the UK, assess temporal trends and evaluate changes in bags over 50, 25 and 12 years for 30 bird species and 15 mammal species, as well as for numbers released of four bird species. Total UK bags and numbers released in the 2004 and 201...
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#1Nicholas Hesford (Game & Wildlife Conservation Trust)H-Index: 1
#2Kathy Fletcher (Game & Wildlife Conservation Trust)H-Index: 4
Last.David Baines (Game & Wildlife Conservation Trust)H-Index: 17
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Mountain hares (Lepus timidus) are regularly harvested on Scottish moorland managed for recreational hunting of red grouse (Lagopus lagopus scotica). There are concerns that large-scale culls of mountain hares on grouse moors are contributing to population declines of mountain hares in Scotland. We use hare data collected during red grouse counts in Scotland, to consider spatial and temporal variation in annual mountain hare indices of spring abundance in relation to different grouse management ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Sonja C. LudwigH-Index: 9
#2Nicholas J. Aebischer (Game & Wildlife Conservation Trust)H-Index: 29
Last.David BainesH-Index: 17
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Understanding demographic mechanisms is key to managing animal populations, both in conservation and game management. We examine which life-stages contributed most to population growth in a recovering red grouse Lagopus lagopus scotica population following restoration of management aimed at resuming economically viable harvesting. Demographic parameters derived from biannual grouse counts and from radio-tagged individuals were analysed using ‘standard demographic accounting’. When parameter esti...
3 CitationsSource
#1Robert E. KenwardH-Index: 29
#2Eduardo M. ArrautH-Index: 1
Last.Nicholas J. Aebischer (Game & Wildlife Conservation Trust)H-Index: 29
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An animal’s home-range can be expected to encompass the resources it requires for surviving or reproducing. Thus, animals inhabiting a heterogeneous landscape, where resource patches vary in size, shape and distribution, will naturally have home-ranges of varied sizes, so that each home-range encompasses a minimum required amount of a resource. Home-range size can be estimated from telemetry data, and often key resources, or proxies for them such as the areas of important habitat types, can be m...
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#1Sonja C. Ludwig (Game & Wildlife Conservation Trust)H-Index: 9
#2Aly McCluskie (RSPB: Royal Society for the Protection of Birds)H-Index: 4
Last.David Baines (Game & Wildlife Conservation Trust)H-Index: 17
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ABSTRACTCapsule: Diversionary feeding reduced Hen Harrier Circus cyaneus nestlings’ natural food intake by half. Red Grouse Lagopus lagopus scotica chicks constituted 0–4% of all nestling food items. Annually, this reduced annual grouse chick production by 0–6%.Aim: To quantify proportions of diversionary and natural food (including grouse) delivered to Hen Harrier nestlings in relation to brood size, male status and natural prey abundance.Methods: We recorded diversionary food provisioned to 25...
1 CitationsSource
#1Christopher J. Heward (Game & Wildlife Conservation Trust)
#2Andrew N. Hoodless (Game & Wildlife Conservation Trust)H-Index: 12
Last.Nicholas J. Aebischer (Game & Wildlife Conservation Trust)H-Index: 29
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In Europe, woodland bird populations have been declining since at least the 1970s, and in Britain, around one third of woodland bird species have undergone declines over this period. Habitat change has been highlighted as a possible cause, but for some species clear evidence of this is lacking owing to an incomplete knowledge of the species’ habitat requirements. Here, we analyse national data to explain the variation in abundance of a declining woodland bird, the Eurasian Woodcock. A nationwide...
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Loss of heather Calluna vulgaris-dominated moorland in Britain has been associated with long-term declines in Red Grouse Lagopus lagopus scotica, a gamebird of economic importance. We tested whether restoring heather habitat on a grouse moor in southwest Scotland, where heather was previously in decline, improved Red Grouse density, productivity, and survival. We analyzed spatial and temporal relationships between Red Grouse demographic rates, estimated from counts, and habitat variables measure...
1 CitationsSource
#1Peter A. Robertson (Newcastle University)H-Index: 6
#2Aileen C. Mill (Newcastle University)H-Index: 12
Last.Nicholas J. Aebischer (Game & Wildlife Conservation Trust)H-Index: 29
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The release of artificially reared pheasants is a widespread practice in Great Britain, used to increase the number of birds available for hunting. We examined the spatial and temporal patterns of release and shooting between 1960 and 2014 using data from a self-selected sample of 1195 sites. We examined changes in the efficiency of release, the contribution of birds that were not released that year to the numbers shot, and the form of these relationships through time. An annual estimate of the ...
5 CitationsSource
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