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Laura R. Shapiro
Aston University
Developmental psychologyPsychologyCognitionCognitive psychologyPhonological awareness
40Publications
9H-index
607Citations
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Publications 40
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#1Anna Cunningham (NTU: Nottingham Trent University)H-Index: 6
#1Anna J. Cunningham (NTU: Nottingham Trent University)
Last. Laura R. Shapiro (Aston University)H-Index: 9
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: We reconcile competing theories of the role of phonological memory in reading development, by uncovering their dynamic relationship during the first five years of school. Phonological memory, reading and phoneme awareness were assessed in 780 phonics-educated children at age 4, 5, 6 and 9. Confirmatory factor analyses demonstrated that phonological memory loaded onto two factors: verbal short-term memory (verbal STM; phonological tasks that loaded primarily on serial order memory), and nonword...
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#1Selma Babayiğit (University of the West of England)H-Index: 9
#2Laura R. Shapiro (Aston University)H-Index: 9
© 2019 UKLA Aims: The primary aim of this study is to augment our understanding of the component skills that underpin second-language learners' text comprehension by examining the direct and indirect roles of vocabulary knowledge and grammatical skills in second-language learners' listening and reading comprehension. Methods: Our sample included 134 learners with English as an additional language (EAL) and 74 with English as first language (EL1) (Mage = 123.76, SD = 5.02 months). Results: Our pa...
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#1Caroline Witton (Aston University)H-Index: 22
#2Katy Swoboda (Aston University)H-Index: 1
Last. Joel B. Talcott (Aston University)H-Index: 31
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Auditory frequency discrimination has been used as an index of sensory processing in developmental language disorders such as dyslexia, where group differences have often been interpreted as evidence for a basic deficit in auditory processing that underpins and constrains individual variability in the development of phonological skills. Here, we conducted a meta‐analysis to evaluate the cumulative evidence for group differences in frequency discrimination and to explore the impact of some potent...
1 CitationsSource
Last. Laura R. ShapiroH-Index: 9
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Vocabulary is vital for accessing learning, yet marked vocabulary differences are apparent at school entry and closely linked to social disadvantage. Vocabulary knowledge can be taught directly, but this is time consuming and even the most ambitious programme could not cover all of the word meanings that are needed to access curriculum texts. A key route to vocabulary learning is independent reading. However, adolescents rarely read in their own time. To increase independent reading in this grou...
#1Julia Badger (University of Oxford)H-Index: 5
#2Laura R. Shapiro (Aston University)H-Index: 9
Abstract We investigated whether category-based induction can be enhanced through educational activities with real-life animals. Four induction tasks involving pictures of real and novel biological kinds were administered to 252 children aged 5- to 7- years, split across two testing sessions. Between these two testing sessions, 129 of these children took part in a zoo-based educational activity where their attention was directed towards the importance of non-obvious category features. In the fir...
1 CitationsSource
#1Adrian Burgess (Aston University)H-Index: 27
#2Caroline Witton (Aston University)H-Index: 22
Last. Joel B. Talcott (Aston University)H-Index: 31
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The longstanding debate between dimensional and categorical approaches to reading difficulties has recently been rekindled by new empirical evidence and developments in theory. At the heart of the categorical perspective is the tenet that dyslexia is a taxon, a grouping of cases that can account for both intra-group similarities and inter-group differences. As developmental dyslexia is characterized by a diverse constellation of symptoms with multiple underlying risk and protective factors, the ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Anna CunninghamH-Index: 6
#2Markéta Caravolas (Bangor University)H-Index: 17
Last. Anne Castles (Macquarie University)H-Index: 34
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#1Laura R. ShapiroH-Index: 9
#2Anna CunninghamH-Index: 6
Last. Kim RochelleH-Index: 4
view all 6 authors...
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#1Anna CunninghamH-Index: 6
#2Laura R. Shapiro (Aston University)H-Index: 9
#1Laura R. Shapiro (Aston University)H-Index: 9
#2Jonathan Solity (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 11
Background: Synthetic phonics is the widely accepted approach for teaching reading in English: children are taught to sound out the letters in a word then blend these sounds together. Aims: We compared the impact of two synthetic phonics programmes on early reading.SampleChildren received Letters and Sounds (LS 7 schools) which teaches multiple letter-sound mappings or Early Reading Research (ERR; 10 schools) which teaches only the most consistent mappings plus frequent words by sight.MethodWe m...
5 CitationsSource
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