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James A. Smith
University of New South Wales
HabitatEcologyFisheryReefBiology
44Publications
15H-index
695Citations
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Publications 49
Newest
#1Hayden T. Schilling (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 2
#2Jason D. Everett (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 15
Last. Iain M. Suthers (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 36
view all 8 authors...
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#1James A. Smith (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 15
#2Desiree Tommasi (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 9
Last. Michael G. Jacox (ESRL: Earth System Research Laboratory)H-Index: 4
view all 9 authors...
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#1Derrick O. Cruz (Griffith University)H-Index: 3
#2Richard T. Kingsford (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 37
Last. Angela H. Arthington (Griffith University)H-Index: 46
view all 6 authors...
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#1T Miranda (UNSW: University of New South Wales)
#2James A. Smith (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 15
Last. Adriana Vergés (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 22
view all 8 authors...
Source
#1Georgina Dawson (UNSW: University of New South Wales)
#2Iain M. Suthers (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 36
Last. James A. Smith (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 15
view all 4 authors...
Abstract Forage fish are a vital trophic group in marine ecosystems and numerical models, linking plankton with higher trophic levels. The bioenergetics of a key forage fish in eastern Australia, yellowtail scad Trachurus novaezelandiae, was measured using static respirometry and bomb calorimetry to assess their trophic contribution as both predator and prey. The temperature-dependent standard metabolic rate (SMR) of yellowtail scad was 0.62 mgO2 g−0.79 h−1 and Q10 of 1.98. The SMR was used with...
Source
#1Simon B.Z. Gorta (UNSW: University of New South Wales)
#2James A. Smith (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 15
Last. Corey T. Callaghan (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 4
view all 13 authors...
Abstract Many seabird communities are declining around the world, a trend frequently linked to climate change and human impacts on habitat and prey. Time series observations of seabirds away from breeding colonies are generally rare, which limits our understanding of long-term changes for conservation actions. We analysed a dedicated citizen science dataset of pelagic seabird abundance (86 species – 30 used for modelling analysis - from 385 trips) from two locations over 17 years (2000–2016) and...
Source
#1Hayden T. Schilling (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 2
#2James A. Smith (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 15
Last. Iain M. Suthers (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 36
view all 6 authors...
Pomatomus saltatrix is an important recreational fishing species with seven major populations worldwide. The reproductive biology of the southwest Pacific Ocean (east Australian) population is uncertain, with both an extended spawning and multiple spawning periods previously hypothesised. Here we demonstrate an altered sex ratio biased towards females and a larger length at 50% maturity (L) compared to those recorded for the population 40 years ago, before comprehensive management strategies wer...
Source
#1James A. Smith (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 15
#2Bradley D. Eyre (SCU: Southern Cross University)H-Index: 46
Last. Matthew D. Taylor (New South Wales Department of Primary Industries)H-Index: 30
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Stocking is increasingly used as a tool for fishery enhancement in estuarine environments. Stocking densities are often estimated by modelling resource availability, but this can be difficult for lower trophic level species, such as crustaceans, which can consume a wide variety of difficult-to-sample food resources. We present a stocking model that uses net ecosystem metabolism (NEM) as the basis for a production-based stocking model, which simulates maximum stocking density by balancing NEM wit...
1 CitationsSource
#1Alistair BeckerH-Index: 13
#2James A. Smith (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 15
Last. Michael B. LowryH-Index: 14
view all 5 authors...
Abstract The deployment of artificial reef systems is rapidly increasing, typically using modules constructed from concrete or steel in a “reef-field” configuration. Such reefs provide habitat for a range of pelagic and benthic reef-associated fish species, yet little is understood of how the configuration of reef fields may affect the distribution of fish. Observations of fish from 930 camera deployments were used to model the assemblage distribution over a distance of 500 m from the reef field...
Source
#1Eliza C. Heery (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 6
#2Katherine A. Dafforn (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 20
Last. Mariana Mayer-Pinto (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 13
view all 5 authors...
Abstract Artificial structures are agents of change in marine ecosystems. They add novel habitat for hard-substrate organisms and modify the surrounding environment. Most research to date has focused on the communities living directly on artificial structures, and more research is needed on the potential impacts these structures have on nearby communities and the surrounding environment. We compared the sedimentary habitat surrounding two types of artificial structures (pilings and seawalls) to ...
2 CitationsSource
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