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Ronald S. Burt
University of Chicago
147Publications
54H-index
39.3kCitations
Publications 147
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#1Ronald S. Burt (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 54
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#1Sonja OpperH-Index: 2
#2Ronald S. Burt (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 54
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#1Marissa King (Yale University)H-Index: 15
#2Ronald S. Burt (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 54
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#1Ronald S. Burt (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 54
Abstract Despite population opinion in China favoring men over women, data on a large probability sample of Chinese entrepreneurs show that men and women — on average — build similar network structures, experience similar distributions of network advantage, achieve similar levels of business success, and experience similar performance returns to their network advantage. Digging into network content, male and female entrepreneurs have similarly close and trusting relations with similar kinds of c...
1 CitationsSource
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#1Ronald S. Burt (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 54
This article is about the network theory of advantage applied to entrepreneurship and an area-probability sample of 700 Chinese entrepreneurs, using 2,193 American and European managers as a baseline comparison group. The article deals with how certain entrepreneurs are disadvantaged by their networks, the contrasting forms that disadvantage takes in China and the West, the role of family in the Chinese networks, and ultimately the robustness of network theory to the cultural, structural, and co...
9 CitationsSource
#1Sonja OpperH-Index: 2
#2Ronald S. BurtH-Index: 54
Last.Håkan J. HolmH-Index: 13
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Cooperation with strangers in one-shot encounters poses a puzzle that is difficult to reconcile with perspectives of rational self-interest and natural selection. The quality of prior “social experience” offers a possible explanation, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. We hypothesize that people in more closed social networks are less likely to cooperate with a stranger. Further, success reinforces the network predisposition. Regardless of the reason for success, people who have enjoy...
1 CitationsSource
#1Ronald S. Burt (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 54
#2Yanjie Bian (Xi'an Jiaotong University)H-Index: 22
Last.Sonja Opper (Lund University)H-Index: 15
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The strong ties known in China as guanxi can be distinguished by a high level of trust relatively independent of the surrounding social structure. Using network data from a stratified probability sample of 700 entrepreneurs citing 4664 contacts, we study guanxi relative to other relations to learn how much individual differences such as well-being, business differences, political participation and demographic factors matter for the guanxi distinction. Two findings stand out: First, the connectio...
11 CitationsSource
#1Chenlin Zhao (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 1
#2Ronald S. Burt (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 54
We extend Burt, Burzynska, and Opper's cross-sectional network prediction of relative success among Chinese entrepreneurs by predicting which ventures are still active five years later. The cross-sectional analysis is corroborated in three ways (despite the vicissitudes of a national anti-corruption campaign): (1) Businesses run in 2012 by CEOs with a network rich in structural holes are more likely to be active five years later, in 2017. (2) Survival odds are improved if the large, open network...
9 CitationsSource
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