Match!
Inger Auestad
Sogn og Fjordane University College
VegetationEcologySpecies richnessRestoration ecologyBiology
17Publications
7H-index
142Citations
What is this?
Publications 18
Newest
#1Inger AuestadH-Index: 7
#2Knut RydgrenH-Index: 23
Last. Rune HalvorsenH-Index: 6
view all 3 authors...
Source
#1Knut RydgrenH-Index: 23
#2Inger AuestadH-Index: 7
Last. Jan Sulavik (AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 1
view all 7 authors...
Source
#1Julien Martin Marie Vollering (AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)
#2Rune Halvorsen (AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 20
Last. Knut RydgrenH-Index: 23
view all 4 authors...
Source
#1Knut RydgrenH-Index: 3
#2Rune Halvorsen (AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 20
Last. Jan Sulavik (AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 1
view all 7 authors...
Source
#1Inger AuestadH-Index: 7
#2Yngve NilsenH-Index: 1
Last. Knut RydgrenH-Index: 23
view all 3 authors...
Hydropower is expanding globally and is regarded a key measure for mitigating climate change, but it also results in major environmental degradation, both at local scale and more widely. We can learn lessons about how restoration can be used to alleviate these problems from failures and successes in countries with a long history of hydropower development, such as Norway. Here, hydropower projects grew larger over time, and in the 1960s, the emerging environmentalist movement started to challenge...
1 CitationsSource
#1Knut RydgrenH-Index: 23
#2Rune HalvorsenH-Index: 20
Last. Jan SulavikH-Index: 1
view all 7 authors...
Source
#1Knut RydgrenH-Index: 23
#2Rune HalvorsenH-Index: 20
Last. Jan SulavikH-Index: 1
view all 7 authors...
#1Knut Rydgren (Sogn og Fjordane University College)H-Index: 3
#2Inger Auestad (Sogn og Fjordane University College)H-Index: 7
Last. Gudrun Skjerdal (Sogn og Fjordane University College)H-Index: 2
view all 6 authors...
Spoil heaps are the visible footprint of hydropower production, particularly in vulnerable alpine environments. Speeding up vegetation development by seeding commercial grass species has been a common restoration practice for the last 50 years, but we lack information on whether seeded species decline and allow native plant cover to develop. We visually estimated cover of native vascular plants and five seeded grass species (Agrostis capillaris, Festuca ovina, Festuca rubra, Schedonorus pratensi...
7 CitationsSource
#1Inger Auestad (Sogn og Fjordane University College)H-Index: 7
#2Knut Rydgren (Sogn og Fjordane University College)H-Index: 23
Last. Ingvild Austad (Sogn og Fjordane University College)H-Index: 6
view all 3 authors...
11 CitationsSource
#1Inger Auestad (Sogn og Fjordane University College)H-Index: 7
#2Ingvild Austad (Sogn og Fjordane University College)H-Index: 6
Last. Knut Rydgren (Sogn og Fjordane University College)H-Index: 23
view all 3 authors...
Questions How do various grassland restoration methods (hay transfer from local or distant donors, seed sowing or natural regeneration) perform in restoration of species-rich, semi-natural grasslands? Are any of the donors particularly well suited as reference vegetation? Do bare soil treatments give better results than treatments where the soil is covered? What are the probabilities of steering vegetation development towards donor vegetation under the various restoration treatments? Location Su...
6 CitationsSource
12