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Thomas R. Knutson
Princeton University
129Publications
44H-index
11.9kCitations
Publications 129
Newest
Published on Feb 25, 2019in Nature Communications11.88
Kieran Bhatia1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Princeton University),
Gabriel A. Vecchi60
Estimated H-index: 60
(Princeton University)
+ 4 AuthorsCarolyn E. Whitlock1
Estimated H-index: 1
(GFDL: Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory)
The original version of this Article contained an error in the second sentence of the first paragraph of the ‘Quantile mapping’ section of the Methods, which incorrectly read ‘We primarily focus on results produced using an additive version of QDM26 by making use of R programming language code contained in the CRAN MBC package version 0.10–438.’ The correct version states ‘QDM29’ in place of ‘QDM26’. Also, the third sentence of the first paragraph of the ‘Quantile mapping’ section of the Methods...
Published on Feb 7, 2019in Nature Communications11.88
Kieran Bhatia1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Princeton University),
Gabriel A. Vecchi60
Estimated H-index: 60
(Princeton University)
+ 4 AuthorsCarolyn E. Whitlock1
Estimated H-index: 1
(GFDL: Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory)
Tropical cyclones that rapidly intensify are typically associated with the highest forecast errors and cause a disproportionate amount of human and financial losses. Therefore, it is crucial to understand if, and why, there are observed upward trends in tropical cyclone intensification rates. Here, we utilize two observational datasets to calculate 24-hour wind speed changes over the period 1982–2009. We compare the observed trends to natural variability in bias-corrected, high-resolution, globa...
Published on 2019in Climate Dynamics4.05
Gabriel A. Vecchi60
Estimated H-index: 60
(Princeton University),
Thomas L. Delworth62
Estimated H-index: 62
(Princeton University)
+ 7 AuthorsWilliam F. Cooke7
Estimated H-index: 7
(NOAA: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)
Responses of tropical cyclones (TCs) to CO2 doubling are explored using coupled global climate models (GCMs) with increasingly refined atmospheric/land horizontal grids (~ 200 km, ~ 50 km and ~ 25 km). The three models exhibit similar changes in background climate fields thought to regulate TC activity, such as relative sea surface temperature (SST), potential intensity, and wind shear. However, global TC frequency decreases substantially in the 50 km model, while the 25 km model shows no signif...
Thomas R. Knutson44
Estimated H-index: 44
(GFDL: Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory),
Suzana J. Camargo40
Estimated H-index: 40
(LDEO: Lamont–Doherty Earth Observatory)
+ 7 AuthorsKevin J. E. Walsh32
Estimated H-index: 32
(University of Melbourne)
Capsule summaryWe assess model-projected changes in tropical cyclone activity for a 2°C anthropogenic warming. Medium-to-high confidence projections include increased tropical cyclone rainfall rate...
Published on May 28, 2019in Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society8.17
Thomas R. Knutson44
Estimated H-index: 44
(GFDL: Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory),
Suzana J. Camargo40
Estimated H-index: 40
(LDEO: Lamont–Doherty Earth Observatory)
+ 8 AuthorsKevin J. E. Walsh32
Estimated H-index: 32
(University of Melbourne)
CapsuleWe assess whether detectable changes in tropical cyclone activity have been identified in observations and whether any changes can be attributed to anthropogenic climate change.
Published on Apr 28, 2019in Geophysical Research Letters4.58
Xiaoqin Yan2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Princeton University),
Rong Zhang27
Estimated H-index: 27
(Princeton University)
+ 0 AuthorsT. Knutson (Princeton University)
Published on Jul 1, 2018in Journal of Climate4.80
Jonghun Kam9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UA: University of Alabama),
Thomas R. Knutson44
Estimated H-index: 44
(GFDL: Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory),
P. C. D. Milly13
Estimated H-index: 13
(GFDL: Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory)
AbstractOver regions where snow-melt runoff substantially contributes to winter-spring streamflows, warming can accelerate snow melt and reduce dry-season streamflows. However, conclusive detection of changes and attribution to anthropogenic forcing is hindered by brevity of observational records, model uncertainty, and uncertainty concerning internal variability. In this study, a detection/attribution of changes in mid-latitude North American winter-spring streamflow timing is examined using ni...
Published on Jun 1, 2018in Journal of Climate4.80
Thomas R. Knutson44
Estimated H-index: 44
(GFDL: Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory),
Fanrong Zeng7
Estimated H-index: 7
(GFDL: Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory)
AbstractPrecipitation trends for 1901–2010, 1951–2010, and 1981–2010 over relatively well-observed global land regions are assessed for detectable anthropogenic influences and for consistency with historical simulations from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). The CMIP5 historical all-forcing runs are broadly consistent with the observed trend pattern (1901–2010), but with an apparent low trend bias tendency in the simulations. Despite this bias, observed and modeled tr...
Published on May 16, 2018in Geophysical Research Letters4.58
Xiaoqin Yan2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Princeton University),
Rong Zhang27
Estimated H-index: 27
(Princeton University)
+ 0 AuthorsT. Knutson (Princeton University)
Published on Jan 9, 2018
Thomas R. Knutson44
Estimated H-index: 44
(NOAA: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration),
T. Knutson (NOAA: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)
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