Georg Mohr
University of Texas at Austin
37Publications
20H-index
1,655Citations
Publications 37
Newest
Published on Nov 1, 2018in Molecular Cell 14.25
Georg Mohr20
Estimated H-index: 20
(University of Texas at Austin),
Sukrit Silas3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Stanford University)
+ 8 AuthorsEugene V. Koonin167
Estimated H-index: 167
(National Institutes of Health)
Summary Prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas systems provide adaptive immunity by integrating portions of foreign nucleic acids (spacers) into genomic CRISPR arrays. Cas6 proteins then process CRISPR array transcripts into spacer-derived RNAs (CRISPR RNAs; crRNAs) that target Cas nucleases to matching invaders. We find that a Marinomonas mediterranea fusion protein combines three enzymatic domains (Cas6, reverse transcriptase [RT], and Cas1), which function in both crRNA biogenesis and spacer acquisition from...
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Published on Aug 1, 2018in Journal of Molecular Biology 4.89
Georg Mohr20
Estimated H-index: 20
(University of Texas at Austin),
Sean Yoon-Seo Kang (University of Texas at Austin)+ 5 AuthorsAlan M. Lambowitz62
Estimated H-index: 62
(University of Texas at Austin)
Abstract The thermostable Geobacillus stearothermophilus GsI–IIC intron is among the few bacterial group II introns found to proliferate to high copy number in its host genome. Here, we developed a bacterial genetic assay for retrohoming and biochemical assays for protein-dependent and self-splicing of GsI–IIC. We found that GsI–IIC, like other group IIC introns, retrohomes into sites having a 5′-exon DNA hairpin, typically from a bacterial transcription terminator, followed by short intron-bind...
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Published on Sep 6, 2017in Mbio 6.69
Sukrit Silas3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Stanford University),
Kira S. Makarova76
Estimated H-index: 76
(National Institutes of Health)
+ 17 AuthorsBecky Xu Hua Fu5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Stanford University)
Author(s): Silas, S; Makarova, KS; Shmakov, S; Paez-Espino, D; Mohr, G; Liu, Y; Davison, M; Roux, S; Krishnamurthy, SR; Fu, BXH; Hansen, LL; Wang, D; Sullivan, MB; Millard, A; Clokie, MR; Bhaya, D; Lambowitz, AM; Kyrpides, NC; Koonin, EV; Fire, AZ | Abstract: © 2017 Silas et al. Cas1 integrase is the key enzyme of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas adaptation module that mediates acquisition of spacers derived from foreign DNA by CRISPR arrays. In diverse b...
11 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 26, 2016in Science 41.06
Sukrit Silas3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Stanford University),
Georg Mohr20
Estimated H-index: 20
(University of Texas at Austin)
+ 5 AuthorsAndrew Fire75
Estimated H-index: 75
(Stanford University)
INTRODUCTION Cells use a variety of mechanisms to prevent the propagation of parasitic information. A family of adaptive immune systems associated with CRISPRs in prokaryotes has been shown to protect cell populations from “selfish” DNA, including viruses and plasmids. CRISPR-mediated immunity begins with an “adaptation” phase, involving the heritable acquisition of short sequence segments (spacers) from the genome of the infectious agent by the host. This information is stored within CRISPR arr...
49 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 18, 2015in PeerJ 2.12
Marie-Mathilde Perrineau9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Rutgers University),
Dana C. Price19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Rutgers University)
+ 1 AuthorsDebashish Bhattacharya64
Estimated H-index: 64
(Rutgers University)
Group II introns are closely linked to eukaryote evolution because nuclear spliceosomal introns and the small RNAs associated with the spliceosome are thought to trace their ancient origins to these mobile elements. Therefore, elucidating how group II introns move, and how they lose mobility can potentially shed light on fundamental aspects of eukaryote biology. To this end, we studied five strains of the unicellular red alga Porphyridium purpureum that surprisingly contain 42 group II introns i...
9 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2014in Mobile Dna 5.89
Peter J. Enyeart6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Texas at Austin),
Georg Mohr20
Estimated H-index: 20
(University of Texas at Austin)
+ 1 AuthorsAlan M. Lambowitz62
Estimated H-index: 62
(University of Texas at Austin)
Mobile group II introns are bacterial retrotransposons that combine the activities of an autocatalytic intron RNA (a ribozyme) and an intron-encoded reverse transcriptase to insert site-specifically into DNA. They recognize DNA target sites largely by base pairing of sequences within the intron RNA and achieve high DNA target specificity by using the ribozyme active site to couple correct base pairing to RNA-catalyzed intron integration. Algorithms have been developed to program the DNA target s...
37 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2014in Biotechnology for Biofuels 5.50
Jie Zhang14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Yingang Feng19
Estimated H-index: 19
+ 5 AuthorsQiu Cui14
Estimated H-index: 14
Background Clostridium thermocellum is a thermophilic anaerobic bacterium that degrades cellulose by using a highly effective cellulosome, a macromolecular complex consisting of multiple cellulose degrading enzymes organized and attached to the cell surface by non-catalytic scaffoldins. However, due largely to lack of efficient methods for genetic manipulation of C. thermocellum, it is still unclear how the different scaffoldins and their functional modules contribute to cellulose hydrolysis.
22 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 9, 2013in PLOS ONE 2.77
Georg Mohr20
Estimated H-index: 20
(University of Texas at Austin),
Jie Zhang14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 5 AuthorsAlan M. Lambowitz62
Estimated H-index: 62
(University of Texas at Austin)
n Abstract: OPEN ACCESS Background: Targetrons are gene targeting vectors derived from mobile group II introns. They consist of an autocatalytic intron RNA (a llribozymerr) and an intron-encoded reverse transcriptase, which use their combined activities to achieve highly efficient site-specific DNA integration with readily programmable DNA target specificity. Methodology/Principal Findings: Here, we used a mobile group II intron from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus ...
35 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 1, 2011in Journal of Molecular Biology 4.89
Georg Mohr20
Estimated H-index: 20
(University of Texas at Austin),
Mark Del Campo13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Texas at Austin)
+ 3 AuthorsAlan M. Lambowitz62
Estimated H-index: 62
(University of Texas at Austin)
Abstract The Saccharomyces cerevisiae DEAD-box protein Mss116p is a general RNA chaperone that functions in splicing mitochondrial group I and group II introns. Recent X-ray crystal structures of Mss116p in complex with ATP analogs and single-stranded RNA show that the helicase core induces a bend in the bound RNA, as in other DEAD-box proteins, while a C-terminal extension (CTE) induces a second bend, resulting in RNA crimping. Here, we illuminate these structures by using high-throughput genet...
13 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 25, 2011in Journal of Biological Chemistry 4.01
Talina Watts4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Utah),
Oleh Khalimonchuk22
Estimated H-index: 22
(University of Utah)
+ 3 AuthorsDennis R. Winge32
Estimated H-index: 32
(University of Utah)
Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells lacking Mne1 are deficient in intron splicing in the gene encoding the Cox1 subunit of cytochrome oxidase but contain wild-type levels of the bc1 complex. Thus, Mne1 has no role in splicing of COB introns or expression of the COB gene. Northern experiments suggest that splicing of the COX1 aI5β intron is dependent on Mne1 in addition to the previously known Mrs1, Mss116, Pet54, and Suv3 factors. Processing of the aI5β intron is similarly impaired in mne1Δ and mrs1Δ...
9 Citations Source Cite
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