Match!
Nick J. B. Isaac
University College London
94Publications
35H-index
4,679Citations
Publications 94
Newest
Published on Mar 26, 2019in Nature Communications11.88
Gary D. Powney9
Estimated H-index: 9
,
Claire Carvell21
Estimated H-index: 21
+ 4 AuthorsNick J. B. Isaac35
Estimated H-index: 35
Pollination is a critical ecosystem service underpinning the productivity of agricultural systems across the world. Wild insect populations provide a substantial contribution to the productivity of many crops and seed set of wild flowers. However, large-scale evidence on species-specific trends among wild pollinators are lacking. Here we show substantial inter-specific variation in pollinator trends, based on occupancy models for 353 wild bee and hoverfly species in Great Britain between 1980 an...
Francesca Mancini , Ben A. Woodcock31
Estimated H-index: 31
,
Nick J. B. Isaac35
Estimated H-index: 35
Abstract Agricultural pesticides are a key component of the toolbox of most agricultural systems and are likely to continue to play a role in meeting the challenge of feeding a growing global population. However, pesticide use has well documented and often significant consequences for populations of native wildlife. Although rigorous, regulatory processes for the approval of new chemicals for agronomic use do have limitations which may fail to identify real world negative effects of products. He...
Published on Mar 1, 2019in Insect Conservation and Diversity2.31
Seirian Sumner13
Estimated H-index: 13
(UCL: University College London),
Peggy Bevan (UCL: University College London)+ 1 AuthorsNick J. B. Isaac35
Estimated H-index: 35
(UCL: University College London)
1. Ecological citizen science initiatives are growing in popularity with the increasing realisation of the potential for occurrence records to contribute information on biodiversity. However, citizen science data are justifiably criticised for misidentification, uneven sampling, incomplete detection or selective reporting. 2. Here, we test the accuracy of citizen science data for UK social wasp (Vespinae) species’ distributions. We compared data collected over two weeks by members of the public ...
Published on Jul 4, 2019
Nick J. B. Isaac35
Estimated H-index: 35
,
Tom A. August10
Estimated H-index: 10
,
Charlie Outhwaite
Published on May 15, 2019
Stephen N. Freeman23
Estimated H-index: 23
,
Nick J. B. Isaac35
Estimated H-index: 35
+ 2 AuthorsByron J. T. Morgan37
Estimated H-index: 37
Biodiversity indicators provide a powerful and convenient way to summarise extensive, complex ecological data sets and are important in influencing government policy on biodiversity and conservation. Typically, component data consist of time-varying indices for each of a number of different species. There currently exists a wide range of different biodiversity indicators, but their derivation from these indices varies and they suffer from a range of statistical shortcomings. In this paper we des...
Published on Nov 1, 2018
Nick J. B. Isaac35
Estimated H-index: 35
,
Peter Brotherton5
Estimated H-index: 5
+ 19 AuthorsR. S. Hails6
Estimated H-index: 6
1. Planning for nature conservation has increasingly emphasised the concepts of resilience and spatial networks. Although the importance of networks of habitat for individual species is clear, their importance for long-term ecological resilience and multi-species conservation strategies is less well established. 2. Referencing spatial network theory, we describe the conceptual basis for defining and assessing a network of wildlife areas that supports the resilience of species to multiple forms o...
Published on Nov 1, 2018in Journal of Applied Ecology5.78
Nick J. B. Isaac35
Estimated H-index: 35
(UCL: University College London),
Peter Brotherton5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Natural England)
+ 19 AuthorsRosemary S. Hails31
Estimated H-index: 31
1. Planning for nature conservation has increasingly emphasised the concepts of resilience and spatial networks. Although the importance of habitat networks for individual species is clear, their significance for long‐term ecological resilience and multi‐species conservation strategies is less established. 2. Referencing spatial network theory, we describe the conceptual basis for defining and assessing a network of wildlife areas that supports species’ resilience to multiple forms of perturbati...
Published on Nov 1, 2018in Ecological Indicators4.49
Fiona Burns5
Estimated H-index: 5
(RSPB: Royal Society for the Protection of Birds),
Mark A. Eaton14
Estimated H-index: 14
(RSPB: Royal Society for the Protection of Birds)
+ 22 AuthorsDavid J. Bullock8
Estimated H-index: 8
Clear, accessible, objective metrics of species status are critical to communicate the state of biodiversity and to measure progress towards biodiversity targets. However, the population data underpinning current species status metrics is often highly skewed towards particular taxonomic groups such as birds, butterflies and mammals, primarily due to the restricted availability of high quality population data. A synoptic overview of the state of biodiversity requires sampling from a broader range...
Published on Oct 1, 2018in Ecological Indicators4.49
Charlotte Outhwaite3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UCL: University College London),
Richard E. Chandler23
Estimated H-index: 23
(UCL: University College London)
+ 3 AuthorsNick J. B. Isaac35
Estimated H-index: 35
(UCL: University College London)
Abstract Multi-species biodiversity indicators are increasingly used to assess progress towards the 2020 ‘Aichi’ targets of the Convention on Biological Diversity. However, most multi-species indicators are biased towards a few well-studied taxa for which suitable abundance data are available. Consequently, many taxonomic groups are poorly represented in current measures of biodiversity change, particularly invertebrates. Alternative data sources, including opportunistic occurrence data, when an...
12345678910