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Norris W. Jones
University of Wisconsin–Oshkosh
12Publications
9H-index
267Citations
Publications 12
Newest
#1Thomas H. AndersonH-Index: 15
#2Norris W. JonesH-Index: 9
Last.James W. McKeeH-Index: 9
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10 CitationsSource
#1Robert Lopez (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 6
#2Kenneth L. Cameron (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 24
Last.Norris W. Jones (University of Wisconsin–Oshkosh)H-Index: 9
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Abstract A number of previous studies including two recent reconstructions of Rodinia have considered the Grenvillian basement of Mexico to be continuous with the Laurentian basement of Texas. Isotopic studies and U–Pb dating of zircons from Precambrian granitoids that occur as cobbles and boulders in a Paleozoic conglomerate exposed in the state of Coahuila, northeastern Mexico, indicate the region is underlain by Gondwanan rather than Laurentian basement. Essentially nothing was known of the b...
54 CitationsSource
#1James W. McKeeH-Index: 9
#2Norris W. JonesH-Index: 9
Last.Thomas H. AndersonH-Index: 15
view all 3 authors...
22 CitationsSource
#1Norris W. JonesH-Index: 9
#2James W. McKeeH-Index: 9
Last.Leon T. SilverH-Index: 26
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Pre-Oxfordian Mesozoic subaerial volcanogenic rocks occur in a band extending northwest from Ciudad Victoria, Tamaulipas, to Santa Maria del Oro, Durango. These strata include Nazas, Rodeo, and Caopas Formations in Durango, Coahuila, and Zacatecas; La Boca Formation and its underlying volcanic basement at Canon de Huizachal, Tamaulipas; and volcanic units below La Joya Formation at Real de Catorce and Charcas, San Luis Potosi. Rocks at these localities have similar lithologies, stratigraphic pos...
33 CitationsSource
#1Thomas H. Anderson (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 15
#2James W. McKee (University of Wisconsin–Oshkosh)H-Index: 9
Last.Norris W. Jones (University of Wisconsin–Oshkosh)H-Index: 9
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The Caopas, Rodeo, and Nazas formations exposed in the San Julian uplift of northern Zacatecas are distinguished principally on the basis of style and intensity of deformation; they are parts of the same early Mesozoic(?) volcanogenic suite. This suite was the source for overlying volcaniclastic conglomerate and sandstone (La Joya Formation) that appears transitional into succeeding Late Jurassic (Oxfordian?) Zuloaga Limestone. Deformation that was contemporaneous with the deposition of the lowe...
11 CitationsSource
#1James W. McKee (University of Wisconsin–Oshkosh)H-Index: 9
#2Norris W. Jones (University of Wisconsin–Oshkosh)H-Index: 9
Last.Leon E. Long (University of Texas at Austin)H-Index: 13
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Stratigraphic and petrologic studies, supported by geologic mapping north of the San Marcos fault (central Coahuila), indicate that as much as 3,000 m of coarse Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous detritus was derived from south of the fault. Two coarse Jurassic submarine conglomerate units (Las Palomas and Sierra El Granizo beds of the La Casita Formation) reflect separate episodes of displacement. Younger Jurassic eolianite and marine sandstone (Colorado and Tanque Cuatro Palmas beds of the La...
67 CitationsSource
#1James W. McKee (University of Wisconsin–Oshkosh)H-Index: 9
#2Norris W. Jones (University of Wisconsin–Oshkosh)H-Index: 9
Last.Thomas H. Anderson (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 15
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The Las Delicias basin in northeastern Mexico is defined by a thick sequence of mid(?)-Pennsylvanian through Permian marine strata, which forms most of the basement rocks of the Coahuila island, a terrane that stood above sea level during the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous. Most of the strata accumulated as mass-gravity deposits derived from an active volcanic arc. Principal components of these deposits are (1) andesitic and dacitic debris, (2) pelagic sediment that underwent postdepositiona...
33 CitationsSource
#1James W. McKeeH-Index: 9
#2Norris W. JonesH-Index: 9
Last.Thomas H. AndersonH-Index: 15
view all 3 authors...
About 4000 m of Late Pennsylvanian and Permian rocks exposed NW of Las Delicias (now Nueva Delicias) are all marine sediments deposited below storm wave base. Principal components are andesitic and dacitic volcanic debris, pelagic siliciclastic sediment, and limestone debris. Virtually all of the sediment was transported by mass-gravity processes. Volcanic debris ranges in size from silt and sand of turbidites to great blocks of basin-margin and extra-basinal volcanic rocks which form a more-or-...
#1James W. McKee (University of Wisconsin–Oshkosh)H-Index: 9
#2Norris W. Jones (University of Wisconsin–Oshkosh)H-Index: 9
Last.Leon E. Long (University of Texas at Austin)H-Index: 13
view all 3 authors...
Mesozoic and Tertiary faulting within a 280-km-long, west-northwest–trending zone in Coahuila, Mexico, is inferred from stratigraphic and structural evidence. The fault forms the northern boundary of the Late Jurassic–Early Cretaceous Coahuila Island. Uplift on the south during the Jurassic and Early Cretaceous is indicated by a large detrital lithosome that formed on the northern side of the fault. Clast size within the Early Cretaceous part diminishes northward where the unit is divided into u...
26 CitationsSource
#1Norris W. Jones (University of Wisconsin–Oshkosh)H-Index: 9
#2James W. McKee (University of Wisconsin–Oshkosh)H-Index: 9
Last.Thomas S. Laudon (University of Wisconsin–Oshkosh)H-Index: 2
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Granitic rocks at Potrero de La Mula and Sierra del Fuste, Coahuila, Mexico, are the only known exposures of a Late Triassic pluton that, by the Late Jurassic, stood as a topographically high area until it was inundated by the Cretaceous sea. The principal igneous rock at Potrero de La Mula is a two-feldspar, biotite-hornblende, I-type granite that is cut by comagmatic dikes of six ages and by several shear zones. A Rb-Sr age of 213 ± 14 m.y. and an initial ratio of 0.705 ± .0004 were obtained f...
11 CitationsSource
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