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Jamshid J. Tehrani
Durham University
Phylogenetic treeSociocultural evolutionCultural transmission in animalsSocial psychologyBiology
33Publications
11H-index
851Citations
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Publications 35
Newest
#1Naomi SykesH-Index: 12
#1Naomi Sykes (University of Exeter)H-Index: 2
Last. Luke John MurphyH-Index: 1
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No other animal has a closer mutualistic relationship with humans than the dog (Canis familiaris). Domesticated from the Eurasian grey wolf (Canis lupus), dogs have evolved alongside humans over millennia in a relationship that has transformed dogs and the environments in which humans and dogs have co-inhabited. The story of the dog is the story of recent humanity, in all its biological and cultural complexity. By exploring human-dog-environment interactions throughout time and space, it is poss...
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#1Lauren A. Scanlon (Durham University)
Last. Jeremy R. KendalH-Index: 20
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Forms of non-random copying error provide sources of inherited variation yet their effects on cultural evolutionary dynamics are poorly understood. Focusing on variation in granny and reef knot forms, we present a mathematical model that specifies how these variant frequencies are affected by non-linear interactions between copying fidelity, mirroring, handedness and repetition biases. Experiments on adult humans allowed these effects to be estimated using approximate Bayesian computation and th...
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#1Joseph M. Stubbersfield (Durham University)H-Index: 4
#2Jamshid J. Tehrani (Durham University)H-Index: 11
Last. Emma Flynn (Durham University)H-Index: 23
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Two potential forms of mutation in cultural evolution have been identified: ‘copying error’, where learners make random modifications to a behaviour and ‘guided variation’ where learners makes non-random modifications. While copying error is directly analogous to genetic mutation, guided variation is a specifically cultural process that does not have a close parallel in biological evolution. It has been suggested that the decision-making processes underlying intentional guided variation may prod...
3 CitationsSource
#1Ángel V. Jiménez (University of Exeter)H-Index: 1
#2Joseph M. Stubbersfield (Durham University)H-Index: 4
Last. Jamshid J. Tehrani (Durham University)H-Index: 11
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Abstract Rationale. Although vaccines are an invaluable weapon in combatting diseases, they are often surrounded by controversy. Vaccine controversies usually arise with the claims of some parents or doctors who link vaccines to harmful outcomes. These controversies often negatively affect vaccination coverage. Objectives This experiment simulated a vaccine controversy to understand which content features of vaccination-related information are well transmitted and how this transmission affects v...
3 CitationsSource
#1Alberto Acerbi (TU/e: Eindhoven University of Technology)H-Index: 15
#2Jamshid J. Tehrani (Durham University)H-Index: 11
We experimentally investigated the influence of context-based biases, such as prestige and popularity, on the preferences for quotations. Participants were presented with random quotes associated to famous or unknown authors (experiment one), or with random quotes presented as popular, i.e. chosen by many previous participants, or unpopular (experiment two). To exclude effects related to the content of the quotations, all participants were subsequently presented with the same quotations, again a...
1 CitationsSource
#1Eugenio Bortolini (UPF: Pompeu Fabra University)H-Index: 4
#2Luca Pagani (UNIPD: University of Padua)H-Index: 23
Last. Jamshid J. Tehrani (Durham University)H-Index: 11
view all 13 authors...
In their letter, d’Huy et al. (1) challenge the novelty of our study (2), and question the reliability of some our results in the light of previous folkloric research and geographic biases in the Aarne Thompson Uther (ATU) index (3). In our reply we explain how their criticisms are already largely addressed in our paper (2) or based on misunderstandings that we clarify below. As we make clear in our report (2), the idea that the diffusion of folktales might be linked to migration histories is in...
2 CitationsSource
#1Eugenio Bortolini (UNIBO: University of Bologna)H-Index: 4
#2Luca Pagani (UNIPD: University of Padua)H-Index: 23
Last. Jamshid J. Tehrani (Durham University)H-Index: 11
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E.B. is supported by SimulPast Consolider Ingenio Project CSD2010-00034 funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy, Industry, and Competitiveness. L.P. is supported by the European Union through European Regional Development Fund Projects 2014-2020.4.01.16-0030 and 2014-2020.4.01.15-0012.
11 CitationsSource
#1Alberto Acerbi (TU/e: Eindhoven University of Technology)H-Index: 15
#2Jeremy R. Kendal (Durham University)H-Index: 20
Last. Jamshid J. Tehrani (Durham University)H-Index: 11
view all 3 authors...
We investigate the relationship between cultural complexity and population size in a non-technological cultural domain for which we have suitable quantitative records: folktales. We define three levels of complexity for folk narratives: the number of tale types, the number of narrative motifs, and, finally, the number of traits in variants of the same type, for two well-known tales for which we have data from previous studies. We found a positive relationship between number of tale types and pop...
8 CitationsSource
#1Joseph M. Stubbersfield (Durham University)H-Index: 4
#2Emma Flynn (Durham University)H-Index: 23
Last. Jamshid J. Tehrani (Durham University)H-Index: 11
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Recent research into cultural transmission suggests that humans are disposed to learn, remember, and transmit certain types of information more easily than others, and that any information that is passed between people will be subjected to cognitive selective pressures that alter the content and structure so as to make it maximally transmittable. This paper presents a review of emerging research on content biases in cultural evolution with relevance to the transmission of popular narratives. Thi...
4 CitationsSource
#1Joseph M. Stubbersfield (Durham University)H-Index: 4
#2Jamshid J. Tehrani (Durham University)H-Index: 11
Last. Emma Flynn (Durham University)H-Index: 23
view all 3 authors...
This study used urban legends to examine the effects of a cognitive bias for content which evokes higher levels of emotion on cumulative recall. As with previous research into content biases, a linear transmission chain design was used. One-hundred and twenty participants, aged 16–52, were asked to read and then recall urban legends that provoked both high levels and low levels of emotion and were both positively and negatively valenced. The product of this recall was presented to the next parti...
9 CitationsSource
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