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H. Damon Matthews
Concordia University
97Publications
26H-index
3,781Citations
Publications 97
Newest
#1Yann Chavaillaz (Concordia University)
#2Philippe RoyH-Index: 1
Last.H. Damon Matthews (Concordia University)H-Index: 26
view all 8 authors...
Cumulative CO2 emissions are a robust predictor of mean temperature increase. However, many societal impacts are driven by exposure to extreme weather conditions. Here, we show that cumulative emissions can be robustly linked to regional changes of a heat exposure indicator, as well as the resulting socioeconomic impacts associated with labour productivity loss in vulnerable economic sectors. We estimate historical and future increases in heat exposure using simulations from eight Earth System M...
#1Philip Goodwin (University of Southampton)H-Index: 11
#2Martin LeducH-Index: 7
Last.Alex Rogers (University of Oxford)H-Index: 38
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Abstract. Climate projections are made using a hierarchy of models of different complexities and computational efficiencies. While the most complex climate models contain the most detailed representations of many physical processes within the climate system, both parameter space exploration and Integrated Assessment Modelling require the increased computational efficiency of reduced-complexity models. This study presents an efficient model for projecting local warming across the globe, combining...
#1Chris D. Jones (Met Office)H-Index: 53
#2Thomas L. Frölicher (University of Bern)H-Index: 28
Last.Tatiana Ilyina (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 22
view all 14 authors...
Abstract. The amount of additional future temperature change following a complete cessation of CO 2 emissions is a measure of the unrealized warming to which we are committed due to CO 2 already emitted to the atmosphere. This "Zero Emissions Commitment" (ZEC) is also an important quantity when estimating the remaining carbon budget – a limit on the total amount of CO 2 emissions consistent with limiting global mean temperature at a particular level. In the recent IPCC Special Report on Global W...
#1Nadine Mengis (Concordia University)H-Index: 4
#2Antti-Ilari Partanen (Concordia University)H-Index: 10
Last.H. Damon Matthews (Concordia University)H-Index: 26
view all 4 authors...
Estimates of the 1.5 °C carbon budget vary widely among recent studies, emphasizing the need to better understand and quantify key sources of uncertainty. Here we quantify the impact of carbon cycle uncertainty and non-CO2 forcing on the 1.5 °C carbon budget in the context of a prescribed 1.5 °C temperature stabilization scenario. We use Bayes theorem to weight members of a perturbed parameter ensemble with varying land and ocean carbon uptake, to derive an estimate for the fossil fuel (FF) carb...
#1Richard J. Millar (University of Exeter)H-Index: 7
#2Jan S. FuglestvedtH-Index: 38
Last.Myles R. Allen (Environmental Change Institute)H-Index: 60
view all 10 authors...
In the version of this Article originally published, a coding error resulted in the erroneous inclusion of a subset of RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 simulations in the sets used for RCP2.6 and RCP6, respectively, leading to an incorrect depiction of the data of the latter two sets in Fig. 1b and RCP2.6 in Table 2. This coding error has now been corrected. The graphic and quantitative changes in the corrected Fig. 1b and Table 2 are contrasted with the originally published display items below. The core concl...
#1Anca Hienola (Finnish Meteorological Institute)H-Index: 3
#2Antti-Ilari Partanen (Concordia University)H-Index: 10
Last.Ari Laaksonen (Finnish Meteorological Institute)H-Index: 64
view all 7 authors...
To assess the impact of anthropogenic aerosol emission reduction on limiting global temperature increase to 1.5 °C or 2 °C above pre-industrial levels, two climate modeling approaches have been used (MAGICC6, and a combination of ECHAM-HAMMOZ and the UVic ESCM), with two aerosol control pathways under two greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction scenarios. We found that aerosol emission reductions associated with CO2 co-emissions had a significant warming effect during the first half of the century and th...
#1Antti-Ilari Partanen (Concordia University)H-Index: 10
#2Jean-Sébastien Landry (Concordia University)H-Index: 6
Last.H. Damon Matthews (Concordia University)H-Index: 26
view all 3 authors...
#1Richard J. MillarH-Index: 7
#2Jan S. FuglestvedtH-Index: 38
Last.Myles R. AllenH-Index: 60
view all 10 authors...
The Paris Agreement has opened debate on whether limiting warming to 1.5 °C is compatible with current emission pledges and warming of about 0.9 °C from the mid-nineteenth century to the present decade. We show that limiting cumulative post-2015 CO2 emissions to about 200 GtC would limit post-2015 warming to less than 0.6 °C in 66% of Earth system model members of the CMIP5 ensemble with no mitigation of other climate drivers, increasing to 240 GtC with ambitious non-CO2 mitigation. We combine a...
#1Jean-Sébastien Landry (Concordia University)H-Index: 6
#2H. Damon Matthews (Concordia University)H-Index: 26
The incomplete combustion of vegetation and dead organic matter by landscape fires creates recalcitrant pyrogenic carbon (PyC), which could be consequential for the global carbon budget if changes in fire regime, climate, and atmospheric CO2 were to substantially affect gains and losses of PyC on land and in oceans. Here, we included global PyC cycling in a coupled climate–carbon model to assess the role of PyC in historical and future simulations, accounting for uncertainties through five sets ...
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