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Mark Q. Martindale
University of Florida
237Publications
59H-index
14.6kCitations
Publications 237
Newest
#1David J. Duffy (Whitney Laboratory for Marine Bioscience)H-Index: 10
#2Mark Q. Martindale (Whitney Laboratory for Marine Bioscience)H-Index: 59
Our recent Communications Biology research article revealed the genomic drivers and therapeutic vulnerabilities of sea turtle fibropapillomatosis tumors. Fibropapillomatosis is a debilitating tumorous disease afflicting populations of green sea turtles globally. While a virus is involved in the development of this disease, it is increasingly understood that the key trigger is linked to anthropogenic disturbances of the environment. The specific environmental co-trigger(s) has yet to be functiona...
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#1Julia Ramon-Mateu (Whitney Laboratory for Marine Bioscience)
#2S. Tori Ellison (UF: University of Florida)H-Index: 2
Last.Mark Q. Martindale (Whitney Laboratory for Marine Bioscience)H-Index: 59
view all 4 authors...
Background The ability to regenerate is a widely distributed but highly variable trait among metazoans. A variety of modes of regeneration has been described for different organisms; however, many questions regarding the origin and evolution of these strategies remain unanswered. Most species of ctenophore (or “comb jellies”), a clade of marine animals that branch off at the base of the animal tree of life, possess an outstanding capacity to regenerate. However, the cellular and molecular mechan...
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#1Leslie S. Babonis (Whitney Laboratory for Marine Bioscience)H-Index: 8
#2Joseph F. Ryan (UF: University of Florida)H-Index: 23
Last.Mark Q. Martindale (UF: University of Florida)H-Index: 59
view all 4 authors...
Background Understanding the drivers of morphological diversity is a persistent challenge in evolutionary biology. Here, we investigate functional diversification of secretory cells in the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis to understand the mechanisms promoting cellular specialization across animals.
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#1Michal Levin (Technion – Israel Institute of Technology)H-Index: 5
#2Leon Anavy (Technion – Israel Institute of Technology)H-Index: 4
Last.Itai Yanai (Technion – Israel Institute of Technology)H-Index: 34
view all 26 authors...
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#1Carmen Andrikou (University of Bergen)H-Index: 1
#2Yale J. Passamaneck (Whitney Laboratory for Marine Bioscience)H-Index: 1
Last.Andreas Hejnol (University of Bergen)H-Index: 29
view all 5 authors...
Background: Answering the question how conserved patterning systems are across evolutionary lineages requires a broad taxon sampling. Phoronid development has previously been studied using fate mapping and morphogenesis, yet molecular descriptions are missing. Here we report the expression patterns of the evolutionarily conserved anterior (otx, gsc, six3/6, nk2.1), posterior (cdx, bra) and endomesodermal (foxA, gata4/5/6, twist) markers in the phoronid Phoronopsis harmeri. Results: The transcrip...
1 CitationsSource
#1Xiaocui Xu (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 3
#2Guoqiang Li (Beijing Institute of Genomics)H-Index: 7
Last.Jiang Liu (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 15
view all 21 authors...
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#1Leslie S. Babonis (UF: University of Florida)H-Index: 8
#2Joseph F. Ryan (UF: University of Florida)H-Index: 23
Last.Mark Q. Martindale (UF: University of Florida)H-Index: 59
view all 4 authors...
Understanding the drivers of morphological diversity is a persistent challenge in evolutionary biology. Here, we investigate functional diversification of secretory cells in the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis to understand the mechanisms promoting cellular specialization across animals. We demonstrate regionalized expression of gland cell subtypes in the internal ectoderm of N. vectensis and show that adult gland cell identity is acquired very early in development. A phylogenetic survey of t...
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#1Timothy Q. DuBuc (UF: University of Florida)H-Index: 7
#2Joseph F. Ryan (UF: University of Florida)H-Index: 23
Last.Mark Q. Martindale (UF: University of Florida)H-Index: 59
view all 3 authors...
2 CitationsSource
#1Miguel Salinas-Saavedra (Whitney Laboratory for Marine Bioscience)H-Index: 5
#2Athula H. Wikramanayake (UM: University of Miami)H-Index: 6
Last.Mark Q. Martindale (Whitney Laboratory for Marine Bioscience)H-Index: 59
view all 3 authors...
The β-catenin protein has two major known functions in animal cells. It keeps epithelial tissue homeostasis by its connection with Adherens Junctions (AJ), and it serves as a transcriptional co-factor along with Lef/Tcf to enter the nucleus and regulate target genes of the Wnt/β-catenin (cWnt) signaling pathway. To assess the ancestral role of β-catenin during development we examined its distribution and function in the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi (one of the earliest branching animal phyla) by...
3 CitationsSource
#1Julia Ramon Mateu (Whitney Laboratory for Marine Bioscience)
#2Mark Q. Martindale (Whitney Laboratory for Marine Bioscience)H-Index: 59
It has been known for well over 50 years that ctenophores have the capacity to regenerate but the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this ability are unknown. We have studied wound healing and adult regeneration in the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi and show that cell proliferation is activated at the wound site and is indispensable for whole-body regeneration. Wound healing occurs normally in the absence of cell proliferation forming a scar-less wound epithelium. No blastema is generate...
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