Arthur W. Frank
University of Calgary
163Publications
29H-index
7,337Citations
Publications 163
Newest
Published on Sep 1, 2018in Hastings Center Report 1.47
Arthur W. Frank29
Estimated H-index: 29
Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2018in The Journal of Medical Humanities
Arthur W. Frank29
Estimated H-index: 29
(University of Calgary)
Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 2017in Hastings Center Report 1.47
Arthur W. Frank29
Estimated H-index: 29
If bioethics seeks to affect what people do and don't do as they respond to the practical issues that confront them, then it is useful to take seriously people's sense of rightness. Rightness emerges from the fabric of a life—including the economy of its geography, the events of its times, its popular culture—to be what the sociologist Pierre Bourdieu calls a predisposition. It is the product of a way of life and presupposes continuing to live that way. Rightness is local and communal, holding i...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2017in Literature and Medicine
Arthur W. Frank29
Estimated H-index: 29
Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2017in The Journal of Medical Humanities
Arthur W. Frank29
Estimated H-index: 29
(University of Calgary)
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 25, 2017in Cogent Arts & Humanities
Arthur W. Frank29
Estimated H-index: 29
(University of Calgary)
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2016in Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 0.29
Arthur W. Frank29
Estimated H-index: 29
This review essay situates Abraham Nussbaum's The Finest Traditions of Our Calling (2016) within the contemporary genre of physician memoirs that shade into critiques of institutional medicine. Nussbaum's primary concern is the demoralization of medicine as it becomes increasingly monetized; patients are reduced to body parts and reimbursement schedules. He argues that physicians continue to have considerable choice in how they practice, despite institutional constraints. For bioethics, Nussbaum...
Source Cite
Published on Jul 1, 2016in Health 1.41
Arthur W. Frank29
Estimated H-index: 29
(University of Calgary)
Source Cite
Published on May 1, 2016in Hastings Center Report 1.47
Arthur W. Frank29
Estimated H-index: 29
Narrative ethics holds that if you ask someone what goodness is, as a basis of action, most people will first appeal to various abstractions, each of which can be defined only by other abstractions that in turn require further definition. If you persist in asking what each of these abstractions actually means, eventually that person will have to tell you a story and expect you to recognize goodness in the story. Goodness and badness need stories to make them thinkable and to translate them into ...
3 Citations Source Cite
12345678910
Co-Authors