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Audun Dahl
University of California, Santa Cruz
Child developmentDevelopmental psychologyPsychologyMoral developmentSocial psychology
53Publications
13H-index
602Citations
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Publications 53
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#1Audun Dahl (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 13
#2Rebekkah L. Gross (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 1
Last. Catherine Siefert (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)
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Abstract In deciding when to help, individuals reason about whether prosocial acts are impermissible, suberogatory, obligatory, or supererogatory. This research examined judgments and reasoning about prosocial actions at three to five years of age, when explicit moral judgments and reasoning are emerging. Three- to five-year-olds (N = 52) were interviewed about prosocial actions that varied in costs/benefits to agents/recipients, agent-recipient relationship, and recipient goal valence. Children...
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#1Melanie Killen (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 48
#2Audun Dahl (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 13
Morality has two key features: (1) moral judgments are not solely determined by what your group thinks, and (2) moral judgments are often applied to members of other groups as well as your own group. Cooperative motives do not explain how young children reject unfairness, and assert moral obligations, both inside and outside their groups. Resistance and experience with conflicts, alongside cooperation, is key to the emergence and development of moral obligation.
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#1Audun Dahl (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 13
#2Talia Waltzer (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 3
If rationalization were ubiquitous, it would undermine a fundamental premise of human discourse. A review of key evidence indicates that rationalization is rare and confined to choices among comparable options. In contrast, reasoning is pervasive in human decision making. Within the constraints of reasoning, rationalization may operate in ambiguous situations. Studying these processes requires careful definitions and operationalizations.
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#1Audun Dahl (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 13
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#1Eric A. Walle (UCM: University of California, Merced)H-Index: 10
#2Audun Dahl (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 13
The collection of articles presented by Pollak, Camras, and Cole (2019) provides a stimulating survey of the current state of research on emotional development. However, the special issue also makes apparent the need for defining the construct of interest. Definitions of emotions guide how researchers deal with fundamental theoretical and methodological issues in emotion research. In this commentary, we contrast 2 views of emotion: the structuralist and functionalist perspectives. We illustrate ...
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#1Audun Dahl (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 13
#2Talia Waltzer (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 3
Abstract Conventions play a fundamental, yet contested, role in social reasoning from childhood to adulthood. Conventions about how to eat, dress, speak, or play are often said to be alterable, contingent on authorities or consensus, specific to contexts, and–thereby–distinct from moral concerns. This view of conventional norms has faced two puzzles. Children and adults judge that (a) some conventions should not be adopted and (b) some violations of conventions would be wrong even if the convent...
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#1Talia Waltzer (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 3
#2Charles Baxley (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 1
Last. Audun Dahl (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 13
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ABSTRACTYoung children’s misbehaviours can be challenging to interpret, evaluate, and intervene on. In turn, adults’ interventions on children’s transgressions inform children about how others view...
1 CitationsSource
#1Mahesh Srinivasan (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 9
#2Elizabeth Kaplan (SU: Syracuse University)H-Index: 1
Last. Audun Dahl (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 13
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Conflicts arise when members of one religion apply their norms to members of another religion. Two studies explored how one hundred 9- to 15-year-old Hindu and Muslim children from India reason about the scope of religious norms. Both Hindus and Muslims from a diverse Hindu-Muslim school (Study 1) and Hindus from a homogeneous Hindu school (Study 2) more often judged it wrong for Hindus to violate Hindu norms, compared to Muslim norms, and said the opposite for Muslims. In contrast, children jud...
4 CitationsSource
#1Elliot TurielH-Index: 12
#1Elliot TurielH-Index: 39
Last. Audun DahlH-Index: 13
view all 2 authors...
4 CitationsSource
#1Audun Dahl (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 13
#2Elliot Turiel (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 39
: Children often encounter events that bear on their moral and other evaluations, such as physical aggression and material disorder. Children's perceptions and evaluations are decisive for how they respond to and learn from these everyday events. Using a new method for investigating the development of social perceptions and evaluations, researchers interviewed 3- to 6-year-olds about naturalistic video recordings of harm, disorder, and joint play events. Children distinguished between the situat...
1 CitationsSource
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