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Shûhei Yamamoto
Kyushu University
28Publications
8H-index
164Citations
Publications 28
Newest
Published on Apr 1, 2018in Cretaceous Research 1.93
Kazutaka Yamada2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Tokushima Prefectural Museum),
Shûhei Yamamoto8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Kyushu University),
Yui Takahashi5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Tsukuba)
Abstract A new genus and species of cimicomorphan bug, Aphrastomedes anthocoroides Yamada and Yamamoto, gen. and sp. nov., is described and illustrated based on two specimens preserved in Upper Cretaceous (Cenomanian) amber from the Hukawng Valley of northern Myanmar (Burma). This remarkable cimicomorphan species is tentatively assigned to the family Velocipedidae primarily on the basis of the structure of the labium, forewings, and genitalia. Aphrastomedes is considered best placed in the Cimic...
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Published on Jan 1, 2018in Systematic Entomology 4.24
Shûhei Yamamoto1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Kyushu University),
Munetoshi Maruyama1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Kyushu University)
The rove beetle subfamily Aleocharinae is the largest subfamily of animals known in terms of species richness. Two small aleocharine tribes, Gymnusini and Deinopsini, are believed to be a monophyletic clade, sister to the rest of the Aleocharinae. Although the phylogenetic relationships of the extant lineages have been well investigated, the monophyly of Gymnusini has been questioned due to a series of previous studies and the recent discovery of the aleocharine †Cretodeinopsis Cai & Huang (Dein...
7 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2017in Cretaceous Research 1.93
Paweł Jałoszyński8
Estimated H-index: 8
(AMNH: American Museum of Natural History),
Shûhei Yamamoto8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Kyushu University),
Yui Takahashi5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Tsukuba)
Abstract †Lepicerus mumia Jaloszynski & Yamamoto, sp. nov. is described based on a Cenomanian Myanmar amber inclusion. This is the third known and the best preserved fossil of ‘lepiceroid’ myxophagan beetles, making it possible to carry out a more detailed comparative study than previously published findings. Detailed analyses of diagnostic characters given by previous authors for †Haplochelus (†Haplochelidae) and †Lepichelus (= Lepiceroides ) (Lepiceridae) led to conclusions that some features ...
8 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2017in Cretaceous Research 1.93
Shûhei Yamamoto8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Kyushu University),
Manfred A. Jäch8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Naturhistorisches Museum),
Yui Takahashi5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Tsukuba)
Abstract The first fossil of the family Hydraenidae preserved in amber is described: Archaeodraena cretacea Jach & Yamamoto, gen. et sp. nov. The description is based on a well-preserved adult found in Cretaceous amber from northern Myanmar (Burma). In general appearance, the new genus superficially resembles the extant genus Hydraena Kugelann, which is the largest water beetle genus in the world. The markedly long maxillary palpi and the presence of a fringe of long thin metatarsal setae in A. ...
4 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 2017in Cretaceous Research 1.93
Shûhei Yamamoto8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Kyushu University)
Abstract Ommatidae is a small, but ancient, basally nested family of the hyper-diverse beetles (Coleoptera). Here, a remarkable new taxon, Paraodontomma burmitica gen. et sp. nov., is described based on a well-preserved specimen in Upper Cretaceous Burmese amber. Based on a wider epipleural rim on each elytron, the new genus belongs to the extinct tribe Brochocoleini. This finding further reinforces the idea that the Burmese paleofauna of ommatid beetles was much more diverse and abundant than p...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 2017in Current Biology 9.25
Shûhei Yamamoto8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Kyushu University),
Munetoshi Maruyama10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Kyushu University),
Joseph Parker9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Columbia University)
Fossil morphology is often used to infer the ecology of extinct species. In a recent report in Current Biology, Cai and colleagues [1] described an extinct rove beetle, Cretotrichopsenius burmiticus, from two specimens in mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber (∼99 million years old). Based on morphology and the taxonomic group to which the specimens belong, the authors proposed that Cretotrichopsenius was a termitophile — a socially parasitic symbiont of termite colonies. Moreover, the new taxon was clai...
4 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2017in Cretaceous Research 1.93
Shûhei Yamamoto8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Kyushu University)
Abstract Oxyporinae is a distinct staphylinid subfamily characterized by a large body, remarkably long and projecting mandibles, and large, crescent-shaped terminal labial palpomeres. Previously, only three compression fossils from the Lower Cretaceous Yixian Formation in China were known for the subfamily from the Mesozoic Era. This study describes a remarkable new species, Oxyporus cretaceous sp. nov., based on a single specimen in Upper Cretaceous Burmese amber. This finding is the earliest r...
6 Citations Source Cite
Kazuya Saito9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UTokyo: University of Tokyo),
Shuhei Nomura1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 2 AuthorsYoji Okabe22
Estimated H-index: 22
(UTokyo: University of Tokyo)
Abstract Ladybird beetles are high-mobility insects and explore broad areas by switching between walking and flying. Their excellent wing transformation systems enabling this lifestyle are expected to provide large potential for engineering applications. However, the mechanism behind the folding of their hindwings remains unclear. The reason is that ladybird beetles close the elytra ahead of wing folding, preventing the observation of detailed processes occurring under the elytra. In the present...
6 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 1, 2017in Gondwana Research 5.66
Shûhei Yamamoto8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Kyushu University),
Yui Takahashi5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Tsukuba),
Joseph Parker9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Columbia University)
Jacobsoniidae is a small but perplexing beetle family, with unknown phylogenetic relationships to other polyphagan Coleoptera. To date, only a single fossil jacobsoniid has been described, from Eocene Baltic amber (~ 40 Ma). Here, we push back the oldest definitive record of Jacobsoniidae by approximately 60 million years with a new fossil species recovered from mid-Cretaceous (~ 99 Ma) Burmese amber from Myanmar. Remarkably, exploration of the fossil's morphology with confocal laser scanning mi...
7 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2017in Cretaceous Research 1.93
Paweł Jałoszyński8
Estimated H-index: 8
(AMNH: American Museum of Natural History),
Shûhei Yamamoto8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Kyushu University),
Yui Takahashi5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Tsukuba)
Abstract The Glandulariini (=Cyrtoscydmini) is today the largest, most species-rich and most diverse tribe of Scydmaeninae comprising over 70% of the extant species of this subfamily. Named genera and species of Glandulariini are known mostly from Miocene to Eocene ambers, with only one, recently described Mesozoic taxon. Here we report the second genus of Glandulariini from Upper Cretaceous Burmese amber, Cenomaniola Jaloszynski and Yamamoto, gen. nov., with two species, C. carinata Jaloszynski...
9 Citations Source Cite
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