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Benjamin F. Jones
Northwestern University
76Publications
21H-index
5,322Citations
Publications 76
Newest
#1Yang WangH-Index: 1
#2Benjamin F. JonesH-Index: 21
Last.Dashun WangH-Index: 16
view all 3 authors...
Setbacks are an integral part of a scientific career, yet little is known about their long-term effects. Here we examine junior scientists applying for National Institutes of Health R01 grants. By focusing on proposals fell just below and just above the funding threshold, we compare near-miss with narrow-win applicants, and find that an early-career setback has powerful, opposing effects. On the one hand, it significantly increases attrition, predicting more than a 10% chance of disappearing per...
Scientists and inventors increasingly work in teams, raising fundamental questions about the nature of team production and making individual assessment increasingly difficult. Here we present a method for describing individual and team citation impact that both is computationally feasible and can be applied in standard, wide-scale databases. We track individuals across collaboration networks to define an individual citation index and examine outcomes when each individual works alone or in teams....
#1Ginger Zhe Jin (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 23
#2Benjamin F. Jones (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 21
Last.Brian UzziH-Index: 34
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Teamwork pervades modern production, yet teamwork can make individual roles difficult to ascertain. The Matthew effect suggests that communities reward eminent team members for great outcomes at th...
#1Benjamin F. Jones (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 21
Human capital differences across countries can appear large or small depending on measurement methods. This Reply clarifies key assumptions and conceptual distinctions across accounting approaches. Accounting-based arguments for small human capital differences are difficult to sustain. By contrast, large human capital differences are theoretically and empirically coherent. Non-accounting arguments against large human capital variation are examined and their weaknesses pinpointed. This Reply also...
#1Pierre Azoulay (MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology)H-Index: 18
#2Joshua Graff-Zivin (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 5
Last.Eva C. Guinan (Harvard University)H-Index: 43
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Climb atop shoulders and wait for funerals. That, suggested Newton and then Planck, is how science advances (more or less). We9ve come far since then, but many notions about how people and practices, policies, and resources influence the course of science are still more rooted in traditions and intuitions than in evidence. We can and must do better, lest we resign ourselves to “intuition-based policy” when making decisions and investments aimed at driving scientific progress. Science invited exp...
#1Hans K. HvideH-Index: 15
#2Benjamin F. Jones (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 21
National policies take varied approaches to encouraging university-based innovation. This paper studies a natural experiment: the end of the “professor’s privilege” in Norway, where university researchers previously enjoyed full rights to their innovations. Upon the reform, Norway moved toward the typical U.S. model, where the university holds majority rights. Using comprehensive data on Norwegian workers, firms, and patents, we find a 50% decline in both entrepreneurship and patenting rates by ...
#1Pierre AzoulayH-Index: 18
#2Benjamin F. JonesH-Index: 21
Last.Javier MirandaH-Index: 18
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Many observers, and many investors, believe that young people are especially likely to produce the most successful new firms. We use administrative data at the U.S. Census Bureau to study the ages of founders of growth-oriented start-ups in the past decade. Our primary finding is that successful entrepreneurs are middle-aged, not young. The mean founder age for the 1 in 1,000 fastest growing new ventures is 45.0. The findings are broadly similar when considering high-technology sectors, entrepre...
#1Pierre AzoulayH-Index: 18
#2Benjamin F. JonesH-Index: 21
Last.Javier MirandaH-Index: 18
view all 4 authors...
This paper examines the potential impact of artificial intelligence (A.I.) on economic growth. We model A.I. as the latest form of automation, a broader process dating back more than 200 years. Electricity, internal combustion engines, and semiconductors facilitated automation in the last century, but A.I. now seems poised to automate many tasks once thought to be out of reach, from driving cars to making medical recommendations and beyond. How will this affect economic growth and the division o...
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