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John Horton
University of Northampton
128Publications
19H-index
1,173Citations
Publications 128
Newest
Peter Kraftl22
Estimated H-index: 22
(University of Birmingham),
Jose Antonio Perrella Balastieri1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Sao Paulo State University)
+ 7 AuthorsCristiana Zara1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Birmingham)
This paper critically analyses pervasive contemporary discourses that call for children and young people to be ‘reconnected’ with nature and natural resources. Simultaneously, it reflects upon emerging forms of nexus-thinking and policy that seek to identify and govern connections between diverse sectors, and especially water, energy and food. Both of these fields of scholarship are concerned with connections, of different kinds, and at different spatial scales. Based on a large-scale, mixed-met...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 2019in Area 2.19
Faith Tucker10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Northampton),
John Horton19
Estimated H-index: 19
(University of Northampton)
Fieldwork is central to the identity, culture and history of academic Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences (GEES). However, in this paper we recognise that, for many academic staff, fieldtrips can be a profoundly challenging ‘ordeal’, ill-conducive to wellness or effective pedagogic practice. Drawing upon research with 39 UK university-based GEES academics who self-identify as having a mental health condition, we explore how mental health intersects with spaces and expectations of fieldwo...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 2, 2019in Children's Geographies 1.87
Peter Kraftl22
Estimated H-index: 22
,
John Horton19
Estimated H-index: 19
(University of Northampton)
ABSTRACTThis article provides a reflection on Skelton and Valentine's (1998. Cool Places: Geographies of Youth Cultures. London: Routledge.) book ‘Cool Places’. The article focuses upon the excitement, vitality and sense of challenge that the book afforded when the two authors first encountered it. From these personal memories, the article then offers two sets of wider considerations. In the first, and prompted by the authors’ use of the book in their teaching, it articulates how useful, relevan...
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Published on Oct 1, 2018in Environment and Planning D-society & Space 2.47
John Horton19
Estimated H-index: 19
(University of Northampton),
Peter Kraftl22
Estimated H-index: 22
Reflecting on a study of children’s outdoor play in a ‘white, working class estate’ in east London, this paper argues that social-material processes that are characteristically massy, indivisible, unseen, fluid and noxious have, problematically, remained hidden-in-plain-sight within multidisciplinary research with children and young people. For example, juxtaposing qualitative and autoethnographic data, we highlight children’s vivid, troubling narratives of swarming rats, smearing excrement, and...
8 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 4, 2018in Children's Geographies 1.87
John Horton19
Estimated H-index: 19
(University of Northampton)
ABSTRACTThis essay reflects upon a particular moment at the end of Chris Philo’s Children’s Geographies lecture [see Philo 2016. “‘Childhood is Measured Out by Sounds and Sights and Smells, Before the Dark Hour of Reason Grows’: Children’s Geographies at 12.” Children’s Geographies 14 (6): 623–640. doi:10.1080/14733285.2016.1187896], when discussion turned to cuddly toys. I recall a particular mood constituted in and by this moment: of apparent bashfulness, hesitancy, things-left-unsaid, and dis...
5 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 23, 2018
Peter Kraftl22
Estimated H-index: 22
,
John Horton19
Estimated H-index: 19
This chapter offers a critical engagement with a so-called ‘new wave’ of childhood studies. It begins by critically reviewing recent approaches to studying childhood that have been inspired by Actor-Network, new materialist and posthumanist philosophies. In doing so, we argue for greater attention to, and interdisciplinary collaboration with, research in children’s geographies, which has sought to attend to the nonrepresentational elements of children’s lives. The chapter then argues for a re-th...
Published on Dec 6, 2017
Pia Christensen4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
Sophie Hadfield-Hill7
Estimated H-index: 7
+ 1 AuthorsPeter Kraftl22
Estimated H-index: 22
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Published on Dec 6, 2017
Pia Christensen4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
Sophie Hadfield-Hill7
Estimated H-index: 7
+ 1 AuthorsPeter Kraftl22
Estimated H-index: 22
Source Cite
Published on Dec 6, 2017
Pia Christensen4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
Sophie Hadfield-Hill7
Estimated H-index: 7
+ 1 AuthorsPeter Kraftl22
Estimated H-index: 22
Source Cite
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