Hollie M. Putnam
University of Rhode Island
52Publications
21H-index
1,290Citations
Publications 52
Newest
Published on Jan 3, 2019in Annual Review of Marine Science 12.87
Piero Calosi5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Université du Québec à Rimouski),
Hollie M. Putnam21
Estimated H-index: 21
(University of Rhode Island)
+ 1 AuthorsFanny Vermandele1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Université du Québec à Rimouski)
Evolution, extinction, and dispersion are fundamental processes affecting marine biodiversity. Until recently, studies of extant marine systems focused mainly on evolution and dispersion, with extinction receiving less attention. Past extinction events have, however, helped shape the evolutionary history of marine ecosystems, with ecological and evolutionary legacies still evident in modern seas. Current anthropogenic global changes increase extinction risk and pose a significant threat to marin...
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Published on Jan 3, 2019in Annual Review of Marine Science 12.87
José M. Eirín-López24
Estimated H-index: 24
(Florida International University),
Hollie M. Putnam21
Estimated H-index: 21
(University of Rhode Island)
Marine organisms’ persistence hinges on the capacity for acclimatization and adaptation to the myriad of interacting environmental stressors associated with global climate change. In this context, epigenetics—mechanisms that facilitate phenotypic variation through genotype–environment interactions—are of great interest ecologically and evolutionarily. Our comprehensive review of marine environmental epigenetics guides our recommendations of four key areas for future research: the dynamics of was...
3 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 22, 2019in Scientific Reports 4.12
Alexander Shumaker1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Rutgers University),
Hollie M. Putnam21
Estimated H-index: 21
(University of Rhode Island)
+ 7 AuthorsDebashish Bhattacharya64
Estimated H-index: 64
(Rutgers University)
Corals comprise a biomineralizing cnidarian, dinoflagellate algal symbionts, and associated microbiome of prokaryotes and viruses. Ongoing efforts to conserve coral reefs by identifying the major stress response pathways and thereby laying the foundation to select resistant genotypes rely on a robust genomic foundation. Here we generated and analyzed a high quality long-read based ~886 Mbp nuclear genome assembly and transcriptome data from the dominant rice coral, Montipora capitata from Hawai’...
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Published on Mar 20, 2019in bioRxiv
Nyssa J. Silbiger (California State University, Northridge), Gretchen Goodbody-Gringley4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences)
+ 1 AuthorsHollie M. Putnam21
Estimated H-index: 21
(University of Rhode Island)
Temperature drives biological responses that scale from the cellular to ecosystem levels and thermal sensitivity will shape organismal functions and population dynamics as the world warms. Reef building corals are sensitive to temperature due to their endosymbiotic relationship with single celled dinoflagellates, with mass mortality events increasing in frequency and magnitude. The purpose of this study was to quantify the thermal sensitivity of important physiological functions of a Caribbean r...
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Published on May 8, 2018in bioRxiv
Hollie M. Putnam21
Estimated H-index: 21
(University of Rhode Island),
Raphael Ritson-Williams1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Hawaii)
+ 2 AuthorsRuth D. Gates42
Estimated H-index: 42
(University of Hawaii)
The persistence of reef building corals is threatened by human-induced environmental change. Maintaining coral reefs into the future requires not only the survival of adults, but also the influx of recruits to promote genetic diversity and retain cover following adult mortality. Few studies examine the linkages among multiple life stages of corals, despite a growing knowledge of carryover effects in other systems. We provide a novel test of coral parental preconditioning to ocean acidification (...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 2018in Limnology and Oceanography 3.60
Zachary A. Quinlan1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Kristina Remple1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 7 AuthorsCraig E. Nelson19
Estimated H-index: 19
Dissolved organic matter (DOM) composition is a key determinant of microbial community metabolism and trophic nutrient transfer. On coral reefs, four primary groups of benthic organisms dominate photosynthetic production: corals, macroalgae, microphytobenthos, and encrusting algae on rubble, all of which exude significant quantities of DOM. We conducted a mesocosm experiment to characterize and contrast DOM exudates from these four organismal groups under three levels of continuous inorganic nut...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 2018in Marine Biology 2.21
Christopher B. Wall4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
Contessa A. Ricci (University of Texas at Arlington)+ 3 AuthorsHollie M. Putnam21
Estimated H-index: 21
(University of Rhode Island)
Rising ocean temperatures can induce the breakdown of the symbiosis between reef building corals and Symbiodinium in the phenomenon known as coral bleaching. Environmental history may, however, influence the response of corals to stress and affect bleaching outcomes. A suite of physiological and immunological traits was evaluated to test the effect of environmental history (low vs. high variable pCO2) on the response of the reef coral Montipora capitata to elevated temperature (24.5 °C vs. therm...
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Published on Feb 13, 2018in Frontiers in Marine Science
Emma M. Gibbin6
Estimated H-index: 6
(École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne),
Thomas Krueger7
Estimated H-index: 7
(École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne)
+ 4 AuthorsRuth D. Gates42
Estimated H-index: 42
(University of Hawaii)
The nutritional symbiosis between coral hosts and photosynthetic dinoflagellates is fundamental to the functioning of coral reefs. Rising seawater temperatures destabilize this relationship, resulting in drastic declines in world-wide coral cover. Thermal history is thought to play an important role in shaping a coral’s response to subsequent thermal stress. Here, we exposed Pocillopora damicornis to two thermal acclimation regimes (ambient vs. warm) and compared the effect that acclimation had ...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 1, 2018in Journal of Applied Ecology 5.74
James R. Guest1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Peter J. Edmunds39
Estimated H-index: 39
(California State University, Northridge)
+ 15 AuthorsKevin Gross26
Estimated H-index: 26
(North Carolina State University)
1. Human activities have led to widespread ecological decline; however, the severity of degradation is spatially heterogeneous due to some locations resisting, escaping, or rebounding from disturbances.2. We developed a framework for identifying oases within coral reef regions using long-term monitoring data. We calculated standardised estimates of coral cover (z-scores) to distinguish sites that deviated positively from regional means. We also used the coefficient of variation (CV) of coral cov...
4 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2017in Genomics 2.91
Huan Qiu18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Rutgers University),
Ehud Zelzion9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Rutgers University)
+ 4 AuthorsDebashish Bhattacharya64
Estimated H-index: 64
(Rutgers University)
Abstract Stony coral (Scleractinia) genomes are still poorly explored and many questions remain about their evolution and contribution to the success and longevity of reefs. We analyzed transcriptome and genome data from Montipora capitata , Acropora digitifera , and transcriptome data from 20 other coral species. To our surprise, we found highly conserved, anciently derived, Scleractinia COral-specific Repeat families (SCORs) that are abundant in all the studied lineages. SCORs form complex sec...
1 Citations Source Cite
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