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John Tressler
University of Waikato
30Publications
8H-index
183Citations
Publications 30
Newest
The literature on research evaluation has noted important differences in citation time patterns between disciplines, high and low ranked journals and types of publications. Delays in the receipt of citations suggest that the diffusion of knowledge following discovery is slower, and may thus be associated with a decrease in the impact of research. This paper provides a framework for the comparison of different citation time patterns. Using principles drawn from the literature on stochastic domina...
#1John Gibson (University of Waikato)H-Index: 35
#2David L. Anderson (Queen's University)H-Index: 5
Last.John Tressler (University of Waikato)H-Index: 8
view all 3 authors...
Research quality can be evaluated using citations or from the prestige of the journal that publishes the research. Recent studies advocate for more weight on citations, which measure actual impact, while the journal where an article publishes is merely a predictor of whether it was thought likely to have an impact. Yet there is little comprehensive evidence on the role of citations versus journal quality in evaluating research. In this paper we use data on tenured economists in the University of...
#1David L. Anderson (Queen's University)H-Index: 5
#2John Tressler (University of Waikato)H-Index: 8
This article focuses on the stability of rankings of academics by research productivity in the context of short-term decision-making. In particular, the growing use of national research assessment exercises (NRAE) has increased interest in identifying the contributions of individual researchers to an assessment unit’s output and ranking. The article concentrates on the assessment of individuals using plausible journal ranking schemes. We find that despite statistical evidence of a high degree of...
#1David L. Anderson (University of Waikato)H-Index: 5
#2John Tressler (University of Waikato)H-Index: 8
In this paper we compare the rate of citation-capture across the social sciences and sciences, with particular attention paid to economics and its border disciplines generally located in Schools of Business. We also explore citation time-flow differences between a number of leading journals in economics and a representative science category, and between higher and lower ranked economics journals. Our findings suggest that short-term citation counting, either directly or indirectly, for purposes ...
#1John Gibson (University of Waikato)H-Index: 35
#2David L. Anderson (Queen's University)H-Index: 5
Last.John Tressler (University of Waikato)H-Index: 8
view all 3 authors...
The ranking of an academic journal is important to authors, universities, journal publishers and research funders. Rankings are gaining prominence as countries adopt regular research assessment exercises that especially reward publication in high impact journals. Yet even within a rankings-oriented discipline like economics there is no agreement on how aggressively lower ranked journals are down-weighted and in how wide is the universe of journals considered. Moreover, since it is typically less...
#1David L. Anderson (Queen's University)H-Index: 5
#2John Tressler (Queen's University)H-Index: 8
New Zealand's academic research assessment scheme, the Performance-Based Research Fund (PBRF), was launched in 2002 with the stated objective of increasing average research quality in the nation's universities. Evaluation rounds were conducted in 2003, 2006 and 2012. In this article, we use 22 different journal weighting schemes to generate output estimates of refereed journal article and page production for three 6-year periods (1994--9; 2000--5 and 2006--11). These periods reflect a pre-PBRF e...
#1David L. Anderson (Queen's University)H-Index: 5
#2Warren Smart (Wellington Management Company)H-Index: 1
Last.John Tressler (University of Waikato)H-Index: 8
view all 3 authors...
This paper concerns the relationship between the assessment of the research of individual academics by peer or expert review teams with a variety of bibliometric schemes based on journal quality weights. Specifically, for a common group of economists from New Zealand departments of economics the relationship between Performance-Based Research Fund (PBRF) Research Output measures for those submitting new research portfolios in 2006 are compared with evaluations of journal-based research over the ...
#1David L. Anderson (Queen's University)H-Index: 5
#2John Tressler (University of Waikato)H-Index: 8
The purpose of this paper is to explore the relevance of the citation-based ‘h’ and ‘g’ indexes as a means for measuring research output in economics. This study is unique in that it is the first to utilize the ‘h’ and ‘g’ indexes in the context of a time limited evaluation period and to provide comprehensive coverage of all academic economists in all university-based economics departments within a nation state. For illustration purposes we have selected New Zealand’s Performance Based Research ...
#1David L. Anderson (University of Waikato)H-Index: 5
#2John Tressler (University of Waikato)H-Index: 8
In this study we test for the ‘power’ or aggressiveness of various journal weighting schemes, especially those based on the recursive adjustment methodology first developed by Liebowitz and Palmer. Using data generated by New Zealand’s academic economists, we provide quantitative measures of the differences between recursive adjustment-based schemes and selected alternatives. We then compare the performance of economics departments under each of our journal weighting schemes and, for comparison ...
The paper explores the merits of utilising citation counts to measure research output in economics in the context of a nationwide research evaluation scheme: the New Zealand Performance-Based Research Fund (PBRF). Citations were collected for all refereed papers produced by New Zealand's academic economists over the period 2000 to 2008, and used to estimate the time-lags in between publication and the flow of citations; to demonstrate the impact of alternative definitions of 'economics-relevant'...
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