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John Spink
Michigan State University
33Publications
16H-index
1,004Citations
Publications 49
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#1John Spink (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 16
#2Christopher T. Elliott ('QUB': Queen's University Belfast)H-Index: 44
Last.Cheri Speier-Pero (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 5
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This research project was conducted to understand the data collection needs when addressing food fraud prevention. The foundation for an understanding of the fraud opportunity utilizes a holistic and all-encompassing information sharing system. The anonymous online survey was distributed first to a targeted group of food fraud leaders from manufacturer or brand owner companies and then to a public group. From the 96 survey responses, first, regarding “data” there is generally “enough” and “good ...
5 CitationsSource
#1John Spink (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 16
#2Peter Ben Embarek (WHO: World Health Organization)H-Index: 5
Last.Adam Bradshaw (WHO: World Health Organization)H-Index: 1
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This survey of International Food Safety Authorities Network (INFOSAN) members regarding food fraud prevention, management, education, and information sharing included 166 WHO member states that resulted in 175 responses. The respondents engage in food fraud prevention (70%) or are responsible for food fraud incident response (74%). Nearly all respondents acknowledged a desire for more guidance and information on best practices in managing the full range of “food safety events involving food fra...
2 CitationsSource
#1John Spink (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 16
#2Weina ChenH-Index: 1
Last.Cheri Speier-Pero (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 5
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Abstract Food fraud – intentional deception for economic gain using food – is an emerging research field due to increased awareness of the health hazard, increased regulatory scrutiny, increased awareness of the costs, a seemingly endless stream of identified incidents, and new compliance requirements. Beyond the laws and regulations that are being more routinely applied, commercial standards have expanded to address food fraud. Specifically, since January 2018 the Global Food Safety Initiative ...
17 CitationsSource
#1John Spink (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 16
#2Brian Bedard (NCSE: National Center for Science Education)H-Index: 1
Last.Akhila Vasan (NCSE: National Center for Science Education)H-Index: 1
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2 CitationsSource
#1Brigitte Cadieux (McGill University)H-Index: 2
#2Lawrence Goodridge (McGill University)H-Index: 6
Last.John Spink (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 16
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Abstract The Canadian regulatory framework prohibits selling adulterated food or selling food in a false, misleading or deceptive manner. Although the number of prosecutions for food fraud cases in Canada has steadily decreased in the last decade, except for a spike in 2017, penalties are becoming more severe (i.e. 12-fold increase in fine amount between 2008 and 2018). The majority of cases are in violation with the Food and Drugs Act, Section 5(1), which prohibits “labelling, packaging, treati...
1 CitationsSource
#1John Spink (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 16
Food Fraud – intentional deception for economic gain using food – is one of the most urgent and active food research and regulatory areas. The current state of research has expanded to include criminology, public policy, business enterprise risk management, and implementation of a management system. This range of disciplines has been critical since the hazard analysis, and prevention strategies are fundamentally different when addressing an intelligent human adversary. The broad range of literat...
4 CitationsSource
#1John Spink (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 16
#2P. Vincent Hegarty (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 2
Last.Douglas C. Moyer (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 9
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Abstract Background Food fraud is generally agreed to be defined as an illegal deception for economic gain using food which includes all types of fraud and all products. Food fraud – including the sub-category of Economically Motivated Adulteration or EMA – is an urgent global public policy issue that requires the development of common definitions and harmonized prevention management systems. Scope and approach There is a need to assess the food fraud public policy development steps to understan...
7 CitationsSource
#1John Spink (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 16
This chapter presents the risk analysis application to food fraud prevention. The risk analysis concepts and theories are well known and widely researched but not often adapted to the unique fraud opportunity and resource-allocation decision-making needs for food fraud prevention.
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#1John Spink (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 16
This chapter presents the discipline of Supply Chain Management—both the functions of product moving in the proprietary supply chain from manufacturing to the consumer and also the science of supply chain management. This chapter will introduce the foundational concepts as well as general applications, review key issues such as globalization and an ever more digital supply chain (positives and negatives), and then the role in food fraud prevention.
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#1John Spink (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 16
This chapter addresses the international responses of both the public (governments and nongovernmental organizations) and private (industry or trade associations) activities related to understanding and managing food fraud prevention. To review this scope, there is a very brief overview of incidents to understand the severity of the issue; this is followed by a summary of foundational and more applied activities and then some of the collaboration interactions. The focus includes the UK, EU, Chin...
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