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Mark Casson
University of Reading
276Publications
41H-index
11.8kCitations
Publications 277
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#1Mark CassonH-Index: 41
The optimal location of plants by a global firm is analyzed for the first time using measures of distance along the spherical surface of Planet Earth. With a uniform distribution of customers an optimal location strategy will normally seek a space-filling configuration of identical areas that are as near circular as possible. The hexagonal space-filling solution for location on an infinite plane cannot be generalized to the surface of a sphere. Different spatial patterns are required for differe...
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#1Teresa da Silva Lopes (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 9
#2Mark Casson (University of Reading)H-Index: 41
Last.Geoffrey Jones (Harvard University)H-Index: 27
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This article engages in a methodological experiment by using historical evidence to challenge a common misperception about internalization theory. The theory has often been criticized for maintaining that it assumes a hierarchically organized MNE based on knowledge flowing from the home country. This is not an accurate description of how global firms operate in recent decades, but this article shows it has never been true historically. Using longitudinal data on individual firms from the ninetee...
4 CitationsSource
#1Peter J. Buckley (University of Leeds)H-Index: 59
#2Mark Casson (University of Reading)H-Index: 41
This paper builds on preceding papers. It distinguishes three domains of international business theory: the boundaries of the multinational enterprise, the external environment of the enterprise and its internal structure. The central concern of internalisation theory is the boundaries of the firm. Any general theory of international business must also analyse the external environment and internal structure. Competition dominates the external environment while co-operation dominates internal str...
2 CitationsSource
#1Catherine CassonH-Index: 3
#2Mark Casson (University of Reading)H-Index: 41
This paper examines whether property rents varied within the medieval town of Hull. Scholars have been deterred from analysing medieval urban rents because of a belief that they were ‘fossilised’ from an early stage in town development, and therefore did not reflect economic forces that guided the later development of towns. Hull rents reported in the 1347 rental had been set only recently, however. Statistical analysis of these rents reveals the economic topography of the town and leads to a re...
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#1Mark CassonH-Index: 41
Entrepreneurship studies needs to re-engage with classic disciplines such as economics, history, statistics, geography and sociology. Fifty years ago there was a widely agreed methodology for social science research based on techniques developed by these disciplines. They analysed the evolution of complex social and economic systems in terms of rationality, efficiency, competition, co-operation, equilibrium and stability. Today their insights are misunderstood and increasingly ignored. Entrepren...
#1Peter J. Buckley (University of Leeds)H-Index: 59
#2Mark Casson (University of Reading)H-Index: 41
International Business (IB) is an inherently complex subject because of its global context, the importance of innovation, and the range of ownership and location factors that need to be examined. Here it is argued that IB theory can learn from economics, but that it should not emulate economics too closely because economics makes restrictive assumptions that assume away important issues in IB. We argue that better IB theory can be created by extending existing theories rather than by starting ag...
2 CitationsSource
While entrepreneurs are increasingly recognized as important participants in the medieval economy, their philanthropic activities have received less attention compared to those of the gentry and nobility. This article shows the contribution that the study of medieval entrepreneurs can make to broader business history debates surrounding the identity of philanthropists and their beneficiaries, the types of causes they supported, and their impact on wider society. Philanthropic entrepreneurs used ...
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#1Mark Casson (University of Reading)H-Index: 41
#2Nigel Wadeson (University of Reading)H-Index: 7
There is ongoing debate about the applicability of internalisation theory to Emerging Market Multinationals (EMNEs). Internalisation theory normally describes multinationals exploiting superior knowledge directly abroad rather than licensing its use to foreign firms. We argue that EMNEs can be explained readily in terms of internalisation theory. This involves internalisation in the opposite direction: knowledge is internalised by EMNEs which then exploit it utilising home-country cost advantage...
4 CitationsSource
This paper reviews the scope for economic modelling in international business. It argues for a multi-level theory based on classical internalisation theory. The theory extends the ‘systems approach’ to the multinational enterprise in which modular activities, such as production, marketing and R&D, are linked by flows of semi-processed products and proprietary knowledge. It is shown how this theory can be extended from the firm level to the industry level in order to analyse inter-firm co-operati...
2 CitationsSource
#1Mark CassonH-Index: 41
A state-of the -art review of progress in theories of the multinational enterprise, which extends the internalisation theory of the multinational to the systems level. In presents highlights from the author's research output over the past ten years.
3 Citations
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