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John K. Horne
University of Washington
OceanographyBackscatterEcologyFisheryBiology
128Publications
25H-index
1,973Citations
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Publications 135
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#1Samuel S. Urmy (MBARI: Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute)H-Index: 4
Last. John K. Horne (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 25
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The ocean’s mesopelagic zone is one of the Earth’s largest habitats and contains large numbers of animals, playing important roles in aquatic food webs—notably as food for many marine mammal species. While these communities have been observed for decades on echosounders as sound scattering layers (SSLs), their ecological dynamics remain poorly understood. Using a broadband (0-128 kHz) hydrophone and an upward-looking echosounder (38 kHz) at a cabled observatory in Monterey Bay, CA in early 2019,...
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#1Silvana Gonzalez (UW: University of Washington)
#2John K. Horne (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 25
Last. Eric J. Ward (NMFS: National Marine Fisheries Service)H-Index: 22
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Commercial viability of Marine Renewable Energy (MRE) is progressing but no national or international monitoring standards have been established for wave or tidal energy sites. Standardized monitoring within and across MRE sectors is necessary to expedite project permitting/consenting, detect environmental impacts, and enable comparison among sites and technologies. Acoustic backscatter from a bottom-deployed platform at a pilot wave energy site off Newport, Oregon was compared to data collected...
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#1John K. Horne (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 25
In a perfect acoustic world, acoustic backscatter energy would only be received from targeted animals in experimental measurements or surveys. Backscatter from unwanted targets is considered noise. To increase backscatter from targets of interest the amount of energy in the transmit pulse can be increased but this will also increase all backscatter, and it reduces the ability to resolve individual targets. To balance the tradeoff between high signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and single target resolu...
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#1David W. McGowanH-Index: 2
#2John K. HorneH-Index: 25
Last. Lauren A. RogersH-Index: 10
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#1Julie E. Keister (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 16
#2Timothy E. Essington (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 36
Last. Sandra L. Parker-StetterH-Index: 10
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#1Elizabeth M. Phillips (NMFS: National Marine Fisheries Service)H-Index: 3
#2John K. Horne (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 25
Last. Josh Adams (USGS: United States Geological Survey)H-Index: 8
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1 CitationsSource
#1Claudine Hauri (UAF: University of Alaska Fairbanks)H-Index: 11
#2Seth L. Danielson (UAF: University of Alaska Fairbanks)H-Index: 22
Last. Thomas J. Weingartner (UAF: University of Alaska Fairbanks)H-Index: 36
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Abstract. Although Arctic marine ecosystems are changing rapidly, year-round monitoring is currently very limited and presents multiple challenges unique to this region. The Chukchi Ecosystem Observatory (CEO) described here uses new sensor technologies to meet needs for continuous, high-resolution, and year-round observations across all levels of the ecosystem in the biologically productive and seasonally ice-covered Chukchi Sea off the northwest coast of Alaska. This mooring array records a br...
3 CitationsSource
#1John K. Horne (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 25
#2Dale A. Jacques (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 1
Distributed networks of stationary instruments provide high temporal scope (i.e., range/resolution) observations but are spatially limited as a set of point measurements. Measurement similarity between points typically decays with distance, which is used to set interpolation distances. The importance of analyzing spatiotemporal data at equivalent spatial and temporal scales has been identified but no standard procedure is used to interpolate space using temporally-indexed observations. Using con...
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3 CitationsSource
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