Branding/Logomark minus Citation Combined Shape Icon/Bookmark-empty Icon/Copy Icon/Collection Icon/Close Copy 7 no author result Created with Sketch. Icon/Back Created with Sketch. Match!
Zhiheng Li
Chinese Academy of Sciences
18Publications
8H-index
202Citations
Publications 18
Newest
Published on May 2, 2019in PLOS Computational Biology
Yaser Saffar Talori (THU: Tsinghua University), Jing-Shan Zhao (THU: Tsinghua University)+ 3 AuthorsJingmai K. O'Connor22
Estimated H-index: 22
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
The origin of avian flight is one of the most controversial debates in Paleontology. This paper investigates the wing performance of Caudipteryx, the most basal non-volant dinosaur with pennaceous feathered forelimbs by using modal effective mass theory. From a mechanical standpoint, the forced vibrations excited by hindlimb locomotion stimulate the movement of wings, creating a flapping-like motion in response. This shows that the origin of the avian flight stroke should lie in a completely nat...
Yanhong Pan13
Estimated H-index: 13
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Wenxia Zheng10
Estimated H-index: 10
(NCSU: North Carolina State University)
+ 13 AuthorsJingmai K. O’Connor9
Estimated H-index: 9
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Dinosaur fossils possessing integumentary appendages of various morphologies, interpreted as feathers, have greatly enhanced our understanding of the evolutionary link between birds and dinosaurs, as well as the origins of feathers and avian flight. In extant birds, the unique expression and amino acid composition of proteins in mature feathers have been shown to determine their biomechanical properties, such as hardness, resilience, and plasticity. Here, we provide molecular and ultrastructural...
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Scientific Reports 4.01
Zhiheng Li8
Estimated H-index: 8
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Julia A. Clarke27
Estimated H-index: 27
(University of Texas at Austin)
+ 3 AuthorsZHOUZhonghe47
Estimated H-index: 47
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Modifications to the upper vocal tract involving hyper-elongated tracheae have evolved many times within crown birds, and their evolution has been linked to a ‘size exaggeration’ hypothesis in acoustic signaling and communication, whereby smaller-sized birds can produce louder sounds. A fossil skeleton of a new extinct species of wildfowl (Galliformes: Phasianidae) from the late Miocene of China, preserves an elongated, coiled trachea that represents the oldest fossil record of this vocal modifi...
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Scientific Reports 4.01
Yaser Saffar Talori (THU: Tsinghua University), Yun-Fei Liu (THU: Tsinghua University)+ 3 AuthorsZhiheng Li8
Estimated H-index: 8
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Pennaceous feathers capable of forming aerodynamic surfaces are characteristic of Pennaraptora, the group comprising birds and their closest relatives among non-avian dinosaurs. However, members of the basal pennaraptoran lineage Oviraptorosauria were clearly flightless, and the function of pennaceous feathers on the forelimb in oviraptorosaurs is still uncertain. In the basal oviraptorosaur Caudipteryx both the skeleton and the plumage, which includes pennaceous feathers forming wing-like arran...
Published on Nov 1, 2018in Palaeoworld 1.14
Zhiheng Li8
Estimated H-index: 8
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Fei Yan8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Rice University)
+ 2 AuthorsJulia A. Clarke27
Estimated H-index: 27
(University of Texas at Austin)
Abstract Iodine staining combined with X-ray computed tomography (CT) has become a core approach in anatomy, offering three-dimensional and essentially non-destructive imaging of soft tissues. Although there have been rapid advances in methodologies and techniques, the mechanisms underlying diffusible iodine contrast-enhanced CT are not yet fully understood. The protocols for staining samples of differing sizes and tissue types have not yet been justified theoretically. Here we utilize mass tran...
Evan P. Kingsley6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Harvard University),
Chad M. Eliason9
Estimated H-index: 9
(FMNH: Field Museum of Natural History)
+ 7 AuthorsJulia A. Clarke27
Estimated H-index: 27
(University of Texas at Austin)
In its most basic conception, a novelty is simply something new. However, when many previously proposed evolutionary novelties have been illuminated by genetic, developmental, and fossil data, they have refined and narrowed our concept of biological “newness.” For example, they show that these novelties can occur at one or multiple levels of biological organization. Here, we review the identity of structures in the avian vocal organ, the syrinx, and bring together developmental data on airway pa...
Published on Jun 20, 2018in PLOS ONE 2.78
Zhiheng Li8
Estimated H-index: 8
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
ZHOUZhonghe47
Estimated H-index: 47
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Julia A. Clarke27
Estimated H-index: 27
(University of Texas at Austin)
The tongue, with fleshy, muscular, and bony components, is an innovation of the earliest land-dwelling vertebrates with key functions in both feeding and respiration. Here, we bring together evidence from preserved hyoid elements from dinosaurs and outgroup archosaurs, including pterosaurs, with enhanced contrast x-ray computed tomography data from extant taxa. Midline ossification is a key component of the origin of an avian hyoid. The elaboration of the avian tongue includes the evolution of m...
Min Wang11
Estimated H-index: 11
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Zhiheng Li8
Estimated H-index: 8
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
ZHOUZhonghe47
Estimated H-index: 47
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Abstract Bird skeletons exhibit remarkable modifications that allow for flight. The most distinguishable features are the fusion of the bones in the hand, feet, and pelvis into composite rigid and bony structures. However, the historical origins of these avian bone fusions remain elusive because of the rarity of transitional fossils and developmental studies on modern birds. Here, we describe an Early Cretaceous bird (120 Mya) that has fully fused alular-major metacarpals and pelvis. We discuss ...
Published on Oct 1, 2016in The Auk 2.66
Zhiheng Li8
Estimated H-index: 8
(University of Texas at Austin),
Julia A. Clarke27
Estimated H-index: 27
(University of Texas at Austin)
+ 1 AuthorsTao Deng22
Estimated H-index: 22
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
ABSTRACT Neogene fossils of Old World vultures (Aegypiinae and Gypaetinae) are known from both Old World and New World records. There are no extant Old World vultures in the Americas today, although a large diversity of Gypaetinae is known from Miocene to late Pleistocene records. Despite a comparatively large number of North American gypaetine fossils, complete specimens have rarely been reported from Eurasia and Africa. We describe the exceptional skeleton of a new gypaetine vulture from the l...
Published on Oct 1, 2016in Nature 43.07
Julia A. Clarke27
Estimated H-index: 27
(University of Texas at Austin),
Sankar Chatterjee28
Estimated H-index: 28
(TTU: Texas Tech University)
+ 7 AuthorsFernando E. Novas29
Estimated H-index: 29
Birds make sound in the syrinx, a unique vocal organ situated deep in the chest, but little is known about the evolution of this structure; a fossilized Cretaceous age syrinx from Antarctica is described from a species that might have been capable of making a goose-like honking sound.
12