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Timothy D. Wilson
University of Virginia
PsychologyCognitionCognitive psychologyAffective forecastingSocial psychology
128Publications
56H-index
24kCitations
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Publications 129
Newest
#1Jordi Quiodbach (Ramon Llull University)H-Index: 17
#2Daniel T. Gilbert (Harvard University)H-Index: 53
Last. Timothy D. Wilson (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 56
view all 3 authors...
Abstract Harris and Busseri [Harris, H., & Busseri, M.A. (2019). Is there an ‘end of history illusion’ for life satisfaction? Evidence from a three-wave longitudinal study. Journal of Research in Personality, 83, 103869] examined the changes in life satisfaction people predicted vs. experienced for 30-years based on the three waves of the Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) survey. They conclude that “Contrary to the EOHI [end of history illusion], most individuals either were accurate or antic...
Source
#1Nick Buttrick (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 4
#2Hyewon Choi (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 3
Last. Daniela C. Wilks (University of Porto)H-Index: 3
view all 30 authors...
3 CitationsSource
#1Gregory M. Walton (Stanford University)H-Index: 30
#2Timothy D. Wilson (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 56
27 CitationsSource
#1Erin C. Westgate (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 10
#2Timothy D. Wilson (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 56
9 CitationsSource
#1Timothy D. Wilson (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 56
#2Erin C. Westgate (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 10
Last. Daniel T. Gilbert (Harvard University)H-Index: 53
view all 4 authors...
Abstract This chapter is concerned with a type of thinking that has received little attention, namely intentional “thinking for pleasure”—the case in which people deliberately focus solely on their thoughts with the goal of generating positive affect. We present a model that describes why it is difficult to enjoy one's thoughts, how it can be done successfully, and when there is value in doing so. We review 36 studies we have conducted on this topic with just over 10,000 participants. We found t...
Source
#1David E. Levari (Harvard University)H-Index: 1
#2Daniel T. Gilbert (Harvard University)H-Index: 53
Last. Thalia Wheatley (Dartmouth College)H-Index: 24
view all 6 authors...
Why do some social problems seem so intractable? In a series of experiments, we show that people often respond to decreases in the prevalence of a stimulus by expanding their concept of it. When blue dots became rare, participants began to see purple dots as blue; when threatening faces became rare, participants began to see neutral faces as threatening; and when unethical requests became rare, participants began to see innocuous requests as unethical. This “prevalence-induced concept change” oc...
4 CitationsSource
#1Nick ButtrickH-Index: 4
Last. Timothy D. WilsonH-Index: 56
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#1Sarah Alahmadi (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 1
#2Nick Buttrick (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 4
Last. Timothy D. Wilson (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 56
view all 6 authors...
People find it difficult to enjoy their own thoughts when asked to do so, but what happens when they are asked to think about whatever they want? Do they find thinking more or less enjoyable? In the present studies, we show that people are more successful in enjoying their thoughts when instructed to do so. We present evidence in support of four reasons why this is: without instructions people do not realize how enjoyable it will be to think for pleasure, they do not realize how personally meani...
4 CitationsSource
#1Erin C. WestgateH-Index: 10
#2Timothy D. WilsonH-Index: 56
Last. Daniel T. GilbertH-Index: 53
view all 3 authors...
7 CitationsSource
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