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Sabine C. Jung
Spanish National Research Council
5Publications
4H-index
469Citations
Publications 5
Newest
#1Sabine C. JungH-Index: 4
Last.Maria J. PozoH-Index: 38
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2 Citations
#1Maria J. Pozo (CSIC: Spanish National Research Council)H-Index: 38
#2Sabine C. Jung (CSIC: Spanish National Research Council)H-Index: 4
Last.José Miguel Barea (CSIC: Spanish National Research Council)H-Index: 59
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Plant interaction with beneficial soil microorganisms usually promotes plant growth and increases the plant’s ability to cope with biotic and abiotic stresses. Among these beneficial microorganisms, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are of major importance because they establish mutualistic symbiosis with most plant species. Profound physiological changes take place in host plants upon root colonization by AMF. These changes impact their communication with the environment, altering the outcome ...
13 CitationsSource
#1Ainhoa Martínez-Medina (CSIC: Spanish National Research Council)H-Index: 13
#2Iván Fernández (CSIC: Spanish National Research Council)H-Index: 9
Last.Maria J. Pozo (CSIC: Spanish National Research Council)H-Index: 38
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Root colonization by selected Trichoderma isolates can activate in the plant a systemic defence response that is effective against a broad spectrum of plant pathogens. Diverse plant hormones play pivotal roles in the regulation of the defence signalling network that leads to the induction of systemic resistance triggered by beneficial organisms (ISR). Among them, jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET) signalling pathways are generally essential for ISR. However, Trichoderma ISR (TISR) is believed ...
66 CitationsSource
#1Sabine C. Jung (CSIC: Spanish National Research Council)H-Index: 4
#2Ainhoa Martínez-Medina (CSIC: Spanish National Research Council)H-Index: 13
Last.Maria J. Pozo (CSIC: Spanish National Research Council)H-Index: 38
view all 4 authors...
Symbioses between plants and beneficial soil microorganisms like arbuscular-mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are known to promote plant growth and help plants to cope with biotic and abiotic stresses. Profound physiological changes take place in the host plant upon root colonization by AMF affecting the interactions with a wide range of organisms below- and above-ground. Protective effects of the symbiosis against pathogens, pests, and parasitic plants have been described for many plant species, includin...
318 CitationsSource
#1Maria J. Pozo (CSIC: Spanish National Research Council)H-Index: 38
#2Sabine C. Jung (CSIC: Spanish National Research Council)H-Index: 4
Last.Concepción Azcón-Aguilar (CSIC: Spanish National Research Council)H-Index: 51
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Arbuscular mycorrhizal associations imply a remarkable reprogramming­ of functions in both plant and fungal symbionts. The consequent alterations on plant physiology have a clear impact on the plant response to biotic stresses. In this chapter we discuss the effects of the mycorrhizal symbiosis on plant susceptibility/resistance to potential deleterious organisms, including root and shoot pathogens, root parasitic plants and phytophagous insects, highlighting the mechanisms that may be operating...
70 CitationsSource
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