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Carolyn M. Boyd
University of South Australia
26Publications
10H-index
565Citations
Publications 26
Newest
Silvia Pignata5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Anthony H. Winefield40
Estimated H-index: 40
+ 1 AuthorsChris Provis9
Estimated H-index: 9
To enhance the understanding of psychosocial factors and extend research on work stress interventions, we investigated the key human resource (HR)/occupational health and safety (OHS) stress interventions implemented at five Australian universities over a three-year period. Five senior HR Directors completed an online survey to identify the intervention strategies taken at their university in order to reduce stress and enhance employee well-being and morale. We also explored the types of individ...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 1, 2017in International Journal of Stress Management 1.95
Michelle R. Tuckey20
Estimated H-index: 20
(University of South Australia),
Carolyn M. Boyd10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of South Australia)
+ 4 AuthorsQuentin Black
Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2017in BioMed Research International 2.58
Silvia Pignata5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Carolyn M. Boyd10
Estimated H-index: 10
+ 1 AuthorsChris Provis9
Estimated H-index: 9
Objective. To build upon research evaluating stress interventions, this qualitative study tests the framework of the extended Job Demands-Resources model to investigate employees’ perceptions of the stress-reduction measures implemented at 13 Australian universities. Methods. In a cross-sectional survey design, tenured and contract staff indicated whether their overall level of stress had changed during the previous three-four years, and, if so, they described the major causes. A total of 462 st...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 25, 2016in Frontiers in Psychology 2.09
Silvia Pignata5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of South Australia),
Anthony H. Winefield40
Estimated H-index: 40
(University of Adelaide)
+ 1 AuthorsCarolyn M. Boyd10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of South Australia)
Purpose - This study examined the factors that predict employees’ perceptions of procedural justice in university settings. The paper also reviews the ethical aspects of justice and psychological contracts within employment relationships. Design/Methodology/Approach - The study examined the predictors of perceived procedural justice in a two-wave longitudinal sample of 945 employees from 13 universities by applying the Job Demands-Resources theoretical model of stress. The proposed predictors we...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 18, 2016in Frontiers in Psychology 2.09
Silvia Pignata5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of South Australia),
Anthony H. Winefield40
Estimated H-index: 40
(University of South Australia)
+ 1 AuthorsCarolyn M. Boyd10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of South Australia)
This study explored the impact of staff group role and length of organizational tenure in the relationship between the awareness of stress interventions (termed intervention awareness: IA) and the work-related attitudinal outcomes of university employees. A two-wave longitudinal study of a sample of 869 employees from 13 universities completed a psychosocial work factors and health questionnaire. Hierarchical regression analyses examined the contribution of staff role and different lengths of or...
4 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 2016in Stress and Health 1.66
Silvia Pignata5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Carolyn M. Boyd10
Estimated H-index: 10
+ 2 AuthorsAnthony H. Winefield40
Estimated H-index: 40
Employing the social-exchange theoretical framework, we examined the effect of employees' awareness of stress-reduction interventions on their levels of psychological strain, job satisfaction, organizational commitment, perceptions of senior management trustworthiness and procedural justice. We present longitudinal panel data from 869 employees who completed questionnaires at two time points at 13 Australian universities. Our results show that employees who reported an awareness of stress-reduct...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 2016in Stress and Health 1.66
Silvia Pignata5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of South Australia),
Carolyn M. Boyd10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of South Australia)
+ 2 AuthorsAnthony H. Winefield40
Estimated H-index: 40
(University of Adelaide)
Source Cite
Published on Jul 3, 2015in Work & Stress 3.14
David Duong1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of South Australia),
Michelle R. Tuckey20
Estimated H-index: 20
(University of South Australia)
+ 1 AuthorsCarolyn M. Boyd10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of South Australia)
ABSTRACTThis review study clarifies the relationships between job characteristics and work–family conflict (WFC) by differentiating among three facets of job characteristics: latent, perceived, and enacted. To date, research linking job characteristics to WFC has not distinguished the facets of job demands and job resources in this way. Such distinctions are important as a means of understanding the affective, behavioural, and cognitive processes involved in determining how and when job characte...
5 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2015in Journal of Occupational Health Psychology 3.77
Michelle R. Tuckey20
Estimated H-index: 20
(University of South Australia),
Ben J. Searle9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Macquarie University)
+ 2 AuthorsHelen R. Winefield39
Estimated H-index: 39
(University of Adelaide)
The challenge-hindrance framework has proved useful for explaining inconsistencies in relationships between work stressors and important outcomes. By introducing the distinction between threat and hindrance to this framework, we capture the potential for personal harm or loss (threat) associated with stressors, as distinct from the potential to block goal attainment (hindrance) or promote gain (challenge). In Study 1, survey data were collected from 609 retail workers, 220 of whom responded 6 mo...
20 Citations Source Cite
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